Video and SPSS Syntax: Progression & Completion Workaround

Roundabout detor” by Cubosh is is licensed under CC BY 2.0

Since we IR folks like to track things, I would ask that if you use this & find it helpful that you let me know- either by sending me a short email (pborkow1@swarthmore.edu) or commenting below (the link to comment is a bit hidden at the end of the tags, but it is there).

If you want to run the Progression & Completion syntax from the previous post, but have found that you don’t have records for EVERYONE in your cohort in the National Student Clearinghouse return file, you are going to need to incorporate your institutional enrollment/graduation data for your students through this workaround (when you submit a cohort file to the Clearinghouse for this project, you should be submitting a begin search date that would pick up the fall term for that cohort. Therefore, everyone in your cohort should have at least one record found).

These instructions & syntax use SPSS to create enrollment/graduation information from your school for your cohort that you can then use with the transfer school information from the Clearinghouse detail return file to determine Progression & Completion.

Continue reading Video and SPSS Syntax: Progression & Completion Workaround

Progression & Completion!

P&C blog pic

Since we IR folks like to track things, I would ask that if you use this & find it helpful that you let me know- either by sending me a short email (pborkow1@swarthmore.edu) or commenting below (the link to comment is a bit hidden at the end of the tags, but it is there).

This progression & completion SPSS syntax works to track enrollment/graduation at your school and other schools (including identifying concurrent enrollment) for a cohort or, if you split your file, for sub-cohorts as well .

Continue reading Progression & Completion!

The Sport of IR

football game
theunforgettablebuzz.com

I was watching the NFL season-opening  game last night.   I’m not actually a football fan, but when your husband writes a book connected to football, it’s one of the sacrifices you make.  (I have also watched DOTA tournaments with my son, and thought it made about as much sense as professional football.   What can I say, I love my guys.)   I was struck by the between-play graphics of the players and their stats, and got to wondering (it wasn’t as if the game held my attention), what kinds of pictures and stats would be shown on a highlights reel of Institutional Researchers.  (You don’t know, it could happen.) Continue reading The Sport of IR

Video and SPSS Syntax: Deleting Select Cases Using the National Student Clearinghouse Individual Detail Return File

There may be some situations where you would want to delete select records from an individual return file. For example, you may have a project where you are looking at student enrollment after graduation or transfer, and it is decided that your particular project will only include records for which a student was enrolled for more than 30 days in a fall/spring term or more than 10 days in a summer term. Or, you may have six years of records for a particular cohort, but you only want to examine records for four years. In both of these cases, you would want to delete the records that don’t fit your criteria before analyzing your data.

Continue reading Video and SPSS Syntax: Deleting Select Cases Using the National Student Clearinghouse Individual Detail Return File

Video and SPSS Syntax: Admit/Not Enroll Project Using the National Student Clearinghouse Individual Detail Return File

Irish United Nations Veterans Association house and memorial garden (Arbour Hill)” by Infomatique is licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

I use the National Student Clearinghouse individual detail return file and SPSS syntax in this video to capture the first school attended for students who were admitted to my institution, but who did not enroll (names listed are not real applicants). In a future video, I’ll work on the same project using the aggregate report. I almost always use the individual detail return file since it provides so much information, but it does have a limitation that impacts this project.

Continue reading Video and SPSS Syntax: Admit/Not Enroll Project Using the National Student Clearinghouse Individual Detail Return File

Decisions, Decisions

I’ve been working with data from the National Student Clearinghouse (NSC) for a while now. A lot of wonderful information can be found in the NSC data, but the detailed return file can sometimes be a bit difficult. There are so many ways the data can be sliced, and it can sometimes be challenging to determine how best to work with the data to present meaningful information to stakeholders.

Continue reading Decisions, Decisions

Rules and Regs

The College has just submitted its Periodic Review Report (or PRR) to the Middle States Commission on Higher Education, our accrediting agency.   The PRR is an “interim” report, provided at the midpoint between our decennial self-studies.    Though it is not quite the bustle of a self-study – e.g. the bulk of the work is accomplished by one committee that works with others across campus, rather than a multitude of committees; there is no on-site visit from a team of examiners – it is an important accreditation event that takes a great deal of time and work to prepare. Continue reading Rules and Regs

Anecdotes versus Data: A False Dichotomy

Photo by Image Editor

Anecdotes often get a bad rap – sometimes deservedly. We have all seen examples of narratives plucked from the public smorgasbord and used to prop up a pre-conceived ideology. Given the prevalence of this often irresponsible and manipulative use of narrative [discussed further in the Huffington Post’sThe Allure of an Anecdote”] it is easy to lose faith in the power of stories. This periodically leads to a surge in demand for hard data and evidence regarding everything from healthcare to higher education. But data and statistics take their fair share of heat as well. For one thing, it turns out that data analysis is subjective too. Data can be manipulated, massaged, and infused with bias. And the strictly ‘objective’ quantitative analysis tends to come across as cold, devoid of feeling, and uninteresting. We know enough to know that numbers never tell the whole story. Standardized testing alone is a grossly inadequate assessment of educational enrichment and when organizations uncompromisingly focus on ‘the bottom line,’ it makes most of us uncomfortable at best.

This methodological tension is an exemplar of how the solution is rarely to be found in the extremes. Unfortunately, these two approaches to knowing the world have such strong advocates and detractors that we are often drawn toward diametrically opposed camps along a false continuum. Compounding the problem is that shoddy and irresponsible research at both ends of the spectrum is regularly circulated in mainstream media outlets.

This divorce is particularly problematic given that quality science, good journalism, and effective research tend to integrate the two. So-called “hard data and evidence” need narrative and story to provide validity, context and vitality. On the other hand, anecdotes and narratives need “hard data and evidence” to provide reliability, and to help separate the substantive from the whimsical. In responsible and effective research and analysis, the methodological dichotomy is brought into synergy, working together as structure and foundation, flesh and bone. The Philadelphia Inquirer printed a series on poverty in 2010 that serves as a good example from the field of journalism [“A Portrait of Hunger”]. Done effectively, data and narrative are inextricably melded into a seamless new creation.

In my short time thus far in Institutional Research at Swarthmore, I have been impressed by many things, one of which is the simultaneous respect for research and evidence-based decision making alongside respect for stories, nuance, and humanity. When the values and mission of a college call for an environment that respects both, it facilitates the practice of effective and balanced institutional research.

Time flies…

Pumpkin carved with "SUN"
photo by thinkgeekmonkeys

The fall has been whizzing by, and here it is Halloween already.   I shouldn’t be surprised, it’s been busier than ever.   (I know. I say that every year.)   We’ve completed two massive projects involving tracking student enrollment and outcomes over multiple cohorts and years, and another one that was small potatoes after those.  The Associate Provost and I have spent a ton of time building on the considerable work of our Middle States Periodic Review Report (PRR) Steering Committee to create a first draft of the report.     Our new IR staff members and I have worked together to get up to speed (including the Fall freeze and fall IPEDS reporting).    We’ve fielded four five! surveys (so far), and are getting pretty darned good at Qualtrics.   (Nothing like troubleshooting to help you learn something.)  I’ve gone through the CITI training for IRB and feel incredibly ethical.    And of course we’ve dealt with all the usual ad hoc requests and miscellany.  But with some of this big stuff behind us, and what is turning out to be a terrific IR team, it’s like the sun coming out.  For the first time in a year it seems we’re almost caught up.  We freeze employee data tomorrow, so that may not last long.