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Bill Ehrhart ’73 and Soldiers for Peace

This morning, I listened to a radio documentary titled “Soldiers for Peace” by Kate Ellis and Stephen Smith via APM reports. The documentary (accessible below) details the participation of veterans and active duty soldiers in the anti-war movement during the Vietnam War. You can find a rich didactic page with photos and excerpts on the APM website.

Bill Ehrhart '73
Bill Ehrhart ’73

The documentary includes Swarthmore alum, writer, and poet Bill Ehrhart ’73, who was a veteran and student of Prof. Thompson Bradley, who passed away this semester. Earlier today, I posted a poem Ehrhart wrote in honor of Bradley. Another poem by Ehrhart and clips of interviews with him appears on the “Soldiers for Peace” page about the radio documentary.

Prof. Lee Smithey

Soldiers for Peace – Part 1:

Soldiers for Peace – Part 2:

 

Friends Historical Library Lecture: “Quaker Peace Testimony in the 20th Century” on Thursday April 11

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Friends Historical Library is presenting a lecture on The Quaker Peace Testimony in the 20th Century on Thursday, April 11, 2019, 4:30 PM, in the McCabe Library Atrium. The speaker is David Harrington Watt, the Douglas and Dorothy Steere Professor of Quaker Studies at Haverford College.
Over the centuries, Quakers have thought about coercion, violence and war in many different ways. This talk will examine the ways in which Henry J. Cadbury (1883-1974)—one of the more prominent figures in the history of modern Quakerism — thought about those issues. In 1919, Haverford’s Board of Mangers accepted Henry Cadbury’s resignation from the college’s faculty. The resignation grew out a controversy connected to Cadbury’s vociferous advocacy of peace. This talk will examine Cadbury’s views on peace, coercion, and war and about what hose views tell use about the history of the Quaker “Peace Testimony.”
Here are event details:

ASHOKA Japan Change Makers coming to Swarthmore!

The Ashoka Japan Youth Venturers will arrive on campus this coming weekend March 24 – March 27th, and will be hosted by the Social Innovation Lab in the Lang Center.  They are traveling a long way to spend time at Swarthmore, so we want to make sure their experience is positive!

Events during their visit include:

Sunday, March 24th 4 pm  WELCOME & PIZZA – Lang Center for Civic and Social Responsibility

Monday, March 25th, 2-5pm and Tuesday, March 25th, 2-3.30pm Ashoka & Swarthmore student Project Presentations in the Social Innovation Lab, Lang Center

The Ashoka Japan Youth Venturer students and Swarthmore students will be giving presentations on their amazing social impact projects!  Come and hear about the amazing change they are creating in the world!


Monday, March 25th, 6pm and Tuesday, March 25th, 6pm 
Dinner in Sharples – please join them and say hello!

If you are planning on being at any of the sessions above, please RSVP to Denise Crossan or Natasha Markov-Riss and add your name to the VISIT SCHEDULE.
Come when you can, leave when you must!

Humanitarian Predicaments: Protracted Displacement and Palestinian Refugee Politics

Please join us on Wednesday, February 6th for a lecture by Ilana Feldman (Anthropology, George Washington University), who will be visiting campus as part of the “Contending Visions of the Middle East” series. Ilana’s lecture draws from her recently published book “Life Lived In Relief” (University of California Press, 2018).
life lived in reflief
February 6
4:30 – 6:00 PM | SCI 101
Humanitarian Predicaments: Protracted Displacement and Palestinian Refugee Politics
Ilana Feldman (George Washington University)

Palestinian refugees’ experience of protracted displacement is among the lengthiest in history. In her breathtaking new book, Ilana Feldman explores this community’s engagement with humanitarian assistance over a seventy-year period and their persistent efforts to alter their present and future conditions. Based on extensive archival and ethnographic field research, Life Lived in Relief offers a comprehensive account of the Palestinian refugee experience living with humanitarian assistance in many spaces and across multiple generations. By exploring the complex world constituted through humanitarianism, and how that world is experienced by the many people who inhabit it, Feldman asks pressing questions about what it means for a temporary status to become chronic. How do people in these conditions assert the value of their lives? What does the Palestinian situation tell us about the world? Life Lived in Relief is essential reading for anyone interested in the history and practice of humanitarianism today.

Sponsored by the President’s Office Andrew W. Mellon Grant, The Lang Center for Civic and Social Responsibility, and the Departments of Political Science, History, Sociology / Anthropology, and Peace and Conflict Studies. For a full schedule of spring events, please consult our website: https://contendingvisions.wixsite.com/mysite

THE INSTITUTE OF MEMORY: Cooper Series Theater Event

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The Department of Theater and the William J. Cooper Foundation are proud to host a week-long residency focused around performances of THE INSTITUTE OF MEMORY (TIMe), an original work created by director/designer/visual artist Lars Jan ’00 and his Los Angeles-based performance company Early Morning Opera.  A combination of autobiography, investigative journalism, and detective story, THE INSTITUTE OF MEMORY confronts the audience with urgent questions about the larger spiritual consequences of political terror, trauma, and privacy in the digital age–and the temptation of simply ignoring them.  THE INSTITUTE OF MEMORY has toured the country and internationally to critical acclaim since 2016.

LOS ANGELES MAGAZINE has called it “trademark Jan, art of the kind of beautiful originality for which he has come to be known.”

THE NEW YORK TIMES described TIMe as: “Presented with dazzling stagecraft.  As a broader exploration of whether a human being can be altered all the way down to his cells and synapses by the nature of the times he has lived through, the piece is startling and disturbing.”

Jan’s  adaptation of Joan Didion’s THE WHITE ALBUM was recently
premiered at the Brooklyn Academy of Music. He is the first person to get permission from the author to adapt the piece for performance.

Lars Jan majored in Theater and English Literature at Swarthmore, and is currently on the theater faculty of the California School of the
Arts (CalArts) outside Los Angeles.  He has been active as a director and integrated media designer in Philadelphia since he graduated from the College in 2000.

Performances of THE INSTITUTE OF MEMORY will take place in the Pearson-Hall Theatre in the Lang Performing Arts Center on Friday, Feb. 1, @ 5 pm, and Saturday, Feb. 2, @ 7 pm.  The performance lasts about 80 minutes, and the opening show on Friday will be followed by a reception in the LPAC lobby.  The Saturday performance will be followed by a post-show discussion with Lars Jan moderated by Prof. Allen Kuharski of the Theater Department.

Both performances are free and open to the public without advance reservation.

Funding support for the residency is also provided by the New England Foundation for the Arts (NEFA).  TIMe was originally commissioned by the Adam Mickiewicz Institute/CULTURE.PL in Warsaw.  Campus co-sponsors for the residency include the Departments of English Literature, Film & Media Studies, Music & Dance, Modern Languages & Literatures (Russian Section), History, Peace & Conflict Studies.

No Empires, No Dust Bowls: Lessons from the first Global Environmental Crisis with Dr. Hannah Holleman

Announcing an Upcoming Lecture!

Download and share a flyer.

No Empires, No Dust Bowls: Lessons from the First Global Environmental Crisis

Dr. Hannah Holleman
Assistant Professor of Sociology at Amherst College

Monday, December 3, 2018 from 4:15 pm – 5:30 pm in the Scheuer Room, Kohlberg Hall, Swarthmore College
This event is free and open to the public. (Campus map)

The 1930s Dust Bowl has become one of the most prominent historical referents of the climate change era amongst scientists and writers. This lecture offers a significant reinterpretation of the disaster with implications for our understanding of contemporary environmental problems and politics. Based on award-winning research and theoretical development, Prof. Holleman reinterprets the Dust Bowl on the U.S. southern Plains as one dramatic and foreseeable regional manifestation of a global socio-ecological crisis generated by the political economy and ecology of settler colonialism and the new imperialism.

She establishes key antecedents to present-day ecological developments and brings the narrative forward to today, explaining the persistent consequences and important lessons of this era for our current struggles to address the planetary challenges of climate change, environmental injustice, and new threats of dust-bowlification.

Hosted by Peace and Conflict Studies with Co-Sponsorship from the Lang Center for Civic Engagement and Social Responsibility, Environmental Studies, and Sociology and Anthropology

Contact: Molly Lawrence at mlawren1@swarthmore.edu, 610-328-7750

Can the Two Koreas Come Together and Change the World? A Talk with John Feffer

Can the Two Koreas Come Together and Change the World
“Can the Two Koreas Come Together and Change the World?”
A talk by John Feffer, Director of Foreign Policy In Focus, Institute for Policy Studies (Washington, DC)
Thursday, November 15, 2018
4:15 pm
Kohlberg 115
North and South Korea have embarked on their most ambitious efforts yet to end the Cold War on the Korean peninsula. The two sides have begun to dismantle structures at the DMZ. They are discussing wide-ranging economic cooperation and even co-hosting a future Olympics. Reunification remains a challenging task, however, given the enormous political, economic, and cultural divide between the two Koreas. Also, inter-Korean rapprochement depends at least in part on the success of nuclear negotiations between the United States and North Korea. Still, if successful, the current detente on the Korean peninsula promises not only to defuse one of the world’s most dangerous faultlines but also bring together a fractious region. It could even provide an example for the world of how to overcome ideological divisions to address common problems.

John Feffer is the author of several books, including North Korea, South Korea: U.S. Policy at a Time of Crisis. His most recent book is the forthcoming novel, Frostlands. His articles have appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, Foreign Policy, Salon, Fortune, and many other periodicals. He served as the East Asia International Affairs Representative for the American Friends Service Committee from 1998 to 2001. He is a graduate of Haverford College.
Sponsored by Asian Studies, Peace and Conflict Studies, the Department of History, and HAN (Korean Student Organization)