Tag Archives: civil rights

FROM CIVIL RIGHTS TO CIVIL LIBERTIES: The impact of black culture and identity on 21st century diplomacy

A presentation by Justin Davis, Deputy Director, Orientation Division, Foreign Service Institute, U.S. Department of State

Friday, December 6th
4:30-6 pm
Sproul 201, Intercultural Center
Swarthmore College

This event is open to the public. You can find directions and a    campus map on the College’s website.

Justin Davis-3

Organized by Peace and Conflict Studies and Co-Sponsored by Black Studies, Political Science, Sociology and Anthropology, the Black Cultural Center, The Intercultural Center, the Office of Inclusive Excellence, and The Lang Center for Civic and Social Responsibility

How the 1971 Burglary of the Media, PA, FBI Office Changed History: A Conversation with Keith Forsyth, Bonnie Raines, and Betty Medsger

Peace and Conflict Studies is co-sponsoring this awesome event tomorrow!

“How the 1971 Burglary of the Media, PA, FBI Office Changed History”

Round table discussion with:
Keith Forsyth, antiwar activist and burglar, auto worker, optical engineer and jazz guitarist; Bonnie Raines, anti-war activist and burglar, civil rights activist and advocate for the needs of children;
and Betty Medsger, former Washington Post reporter, professor of journalism, and author of The Burglary: The Discovery of J. Edgar Hoover’s Secret FBI

McCabe Library Atrium
Swarthmore College
7 p.m., April 3, 2019
Open to the public

The Swarthmore Campus & Community Store will provide books for purchase and signing during the reception to follow

Co-sponsored by

Swarthmore College Peace Collection
Black Studies
Black Cultural Center
Lang Center for Social Responsibility
Peace and Conflict Studies
Political Science
Peace, Justice, and Human Rights-Haverford College

This event will also recognize Betty Medsger’s donation of her papers to the Peace Collection

Check out the video below for a background on the original event:

 

 

 

Architects as Activists, Activists as Architects: Building Equality in the Civil Rights Movement

From our friends in the Art Department:

“Architects as Activists, Activists as Architects: Building Equality in the Civil Rights Movement”

Harlem

Brian Goldstein
Assistant Professor
School of Architecture and Planning
University of New Mexico

Date: Monday, January 30th
Time: 4:15-5:00
Location: Beardsley 316, Swarthmore College

This talk will consider the crucial role that architecture and planning played in the broader battles for justice and equality that defined the Civil Rights Movement. More than a site in which this social movement unfolded, the built environment also served as a key medium through which activists pursued their vision of a better world. Specifically, the talk will focus on examples from Harlem, New York, where residents experimented ambitiously with design and construction in order to gain control over the future of their community.

Brian Goldstein book

From Mississippi to Jerusalem: Jewish Civil Rights Veterans of SNCC

Jewish Civil Rights Veterans S2015

Come learn about the intersection of Judaism and civil rights activism! This 2-day event series features Jewish activists Dorothy Zellner, Ira Grupper, Larry Rubin, and Mark Levy, all of whom participated in the Civil Rights movement as part of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). Come to one or all of the three events! There will be light food and drink!

Hosted by SASS, Race to Action, and formerly-known-as Hillel at Swarthmore College  (directions)

Racial Justice Action Now and Past: Learning from SNCC
March 24
Bond Hall
4:30pm
Too often the civil rights movement is considered a thing of the past. In this panel discussion, we will hear from our panelists how strategies from the Civil Rights movement can be used to effectively advocate for justice today.

Practical Organizing Workshop
March 24
Location TBD – possibly Lang Center for Civic and Social Responsibility
7:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Come learn important skills from experienced organizers! We will discuss topics ranging from self-care to dealing with the press.

From Selma to Jerusalem
March 25
Bond Hall
5:30pm
Our panelists will discuss the relationship between the Civil Rights movement and the current situation in Israel-Palestine.

Facebook invitation for this event.

Dr. Vincent Harding to speak at Pendle Hill on Monday, May 5, 2014

Pendle Hill First Monday Series: Vincent Harding, former distinguished visiting faculty member at Swarthmore 1985-86, Honorary Degree Swarthmore 1987, speaks on “Loved into Life: An Autobiographical Reflection”

May 5, 2014
7:30-9:00 pm
The Barn at Pendle Hill
338 Plush Mill Road, Wallingford, PA

Free and open to the public; no reservations required.
Vincent-Harding-from-On-Being_1.jpgDr. Harding will be introduced by Professor Keith Reeves, Swarthmore College, Department of Political Science.

Join activist-teacher-historian Vincent Harding in an evening of dialogue and exchange about what it means to be loved into life — how the call to love one another speaks to our deepest humanity and draws us forth to stand against injustice and all that diminishes our world community.  Vincent Harding has returned to Pendle Hill to work on his memoirs after a lifetime of teaching and activism.  He invites you to join him as he shares reflections on how he has been loved into life — and to share your stories of how you have responded to love’s call.

A native of New York City, Vincent Harding holds an M.A. and Ph.D. in history from the University of Chicago. Harding and his late wife, Rosemarie Freeney Harding, worked as full-time teachers, activists, encouragers, and negotiators in the Southern Freedom Movement in the 60’s and were Friends and co-workers with such leaders as Martin Luther King Jr., Ella Baker, Fannie Lou Hamer. (Harding provided the initial draft for King’s “Beyond Vietnam” speech at Riverside Church in New York City.) He chaired the History and Sociology Department at Spelman College in Atlanta for several years, and in 1968 became the director of the Martin Luther King Memorial Center and chair of the nationally televised CBS Black Heritage series. Harding was one of the organizers and the first director of the Institute of the Black World, founded in Atlanta in 1969. After holding several research positions and visiting professorships (including two years on the staff of Pendle Hill), he served as professor of religion and social transformation at the Iliff School of Theology in Denver for nearly a quarter of a century and is now professor emeritus and a trustee at Iliff.

For more information, contact John Meyer at 610-566-4507 ext. 129.

Rutgers Conference Commemorates Community Organizing in the Modern Civil Rights Movement

The determined grassroots efforts of individuals who drove the struggle for Civil Rights during the 1960s will be explored at the 2014 Marion Thompson Wright Lecture Series, Tending the Light: Community Organizing and the Modern Civil Rights Movement, Saturday, Feb. 15, 2014, at the Paul Robeson Campus Center, 350 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., on Rutgers University’s Newark Campus, from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Mississippi 1963
(Photo by Danny Lyon
Mississippi, 1963: Martha Prescod, Mike Miller, and Robert Parris Moses doing voter registration work in the countryside. Moses is one of the MTW speakers in February.)
The Series’ 34th installment will commemorate the 50th anniversary of Mississippi Freedom Summer and the Civil Rights Act of 1964 by illuminating the history of community organizing in the black freedom struggle, the immense amount of work such struggle entails, and the heroic individuals who take it on. The daylong conference features four distinguished speakers: Bob Moses, civil rights movement veteran and president and founder of The Algebra Project; Diane Nash, civil rights movement veteran; Charles Payne, the Frank P. Hixon Distinguished Service Professor, University of Chicago; and Barbara Ransby, Professor of History and African-American Studies, University of Illinois at Chicago. MTW speakers will reflect on the history of community organizing, from the perspective of their personal experience and of their scholarship on the topic, as well as the legacy and lessons of such grassroots work for contemporary politics.
Marion Thompson Wright
Marion Thompson Wright, the person behind the lecture series, was the first professionally trained female historian in the U.S.

Immediately following the MTW conference, the audience is invited to attend a free reception at the Newark Museum, 49 Washington St., which also features live musical entertainment by The Bradford Hayes Trio.  Both the MTW conference and museum reception are free and open to the public.

The lecture series was co-founded in 1981 by Dr. Clement Price, Board of Governors Distinguished Service Professor of History at Rutgers University, and the late Giles R. Wright, New Jersey Historical Commission. Over the past 33 years, the conference has drawn thousands of people to the Rutgers-Newark campus and has attracted some of the nation’s foremost scholars and humanists who are experts in the field of African and African American history and culture. It has become one of the nation’s leading scholarly programs specifically devoted to enhancing the historical literacy of an intercultural community.

The annual conference was named for East Orange native Dr. Marion Thompson Wright, a pioneer in African American historiography and race relations in New Jersey, who was the first professionally trained woman historian in the United States.

The Marion Thompson Wright Lecture Series is sponsored by the Rutgers Institute on Ethnicity, Culture, and the Modern Experience; the Federated Department of History, Rutgers-Newark and the New Jersey Institute of Technology; and the New Jersey Historical Commission/Department of State. The 2014 conference receives additional support from the New Jersey Council for the Humanities, the Rutgers Committee to Advance Our Common Purposes, and the Prudential Foundation.

For additional information about the program, visit the Institute’s website at: http://ethnicity.rutgers.edu, or contact the Rutgers Institute on Ethnicity, Culture, and the Modern Experience, 973/353-3891.

Bayard Rustin, Angelic Trouble Maker?

Bayard Rustin, Angelic Trouble Maker?

Film Screening of Brother Outsider

Followed by discussion with Filmmaker Harold Weaver

Tuesday, March 20, 2012

4:30 p.m.

Science Center 199

Swarthmore College

A master strategist and tireless activist, Bayard Rustin is best remembered as the organizer of the 1963 March on Washington, one of the largest nonviolent protests ever held in the United States. He brought Gandhi’s protest techniques to the American civil rights movement, and helped mold Martin Luther King, Jr. into an international symbol of peace and nonviolence.

Despite these achievements, Rustin was silenced, threatened, arrested, beaten, imprisoned and fired from important leadership positions, largely because he was an openly gay man in a fiercely homophobic era. Five years in the making and the winner of numerous awards, /Brother Outsider /presents a feature-length documentary portrait, focusing on Rustin’s activism for peace, racial equality, economic justice and human rights.

You are invited to a special screening of /Brother Outsider/ which will be followed by a discussion with filmmaker, Harold Weaver.

Dr. Harold Weaver is a Non-Resident Fellow, Du Bois Research Institute, Harvard University. He is also a filmmaker and principal curator of “The China Project,” “The Black Quaker Project” and “The Black Film Project.” Co-editor of the 2011 anthology,/ Black Fire: African American Quakers On Spirituality And Human Rights/, Dr. Weaver taught the first course on African cinema in the United States at Rutgers University in 1972.

This event is free and open to the public.

Organized by Sociology and Anthropology, and Black Studies. Funding provided by many programs and departments.