Tag Archives: racism

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day 2022

A few years ago, the College began celebrating Martin Luther King, Jr. Day as a holiday, so the College is closed, and classes don’t begin until tomorrow!

MLK Day is always an important one for our program given our commitment to studying and understanding the powerful and nonviolent pursuit of more just and collaborative relations, as well as the structures of power and inequality that inhibit lives well-lived.

As Dr. King’s Day reminds us, the work can be both dramatic and slow, with the work bearing fruit for decades and more. I just returned recently from visiting family in Nashville , Tennessee and read this morning in the New York Times that a statue of the Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest on Interstate 65 near my home has finally come down. I also learned that the plaza in front of Nashville’s courthouse has been named after Diane Nash, and the city’s newest high school will be named after Dr. James Lawson, both instrumental in the Nashville lunch counter sit-ins and other campaigns during the civil rights movement.

Moreover, inequality and militarism remain dominant in American society. On this MLK Day I would like to re-share the video reading of Dr. King’s Riverside Speech that students, faculty, and staff organized earlier this year. In this powerful speech King warns us about the intersecting dangers of racism, militarism, and materialism.

Let me also remind us of this week’s event on January 21, 2022 titled “Polarization as Possibility: The Justice Strategizing of Bayard Rustin and Martin Luther King, Jr.” featuring our own George Lakey and Professor Terrance Wiley of Religion and Africana Studies at Haverford College. I hope to see some of you there.

Lee Smithey, Coordinator, Peace and Conflict Studies Program

poster featuring an image of Bayard Rustin

Vanessa Julye to deliver Cary Lecture at Pendle Hill: “Radical Transformation: Long Overdue for the Religious Society of Friends”

We are happy to share an important invitation from our friends and neighbors at the nearby Pendle Hill Quaker Retreat Center (in walking distance, just on the other side of Crum Wood).

This year’s Stephen G. Cary Memorial Lecture will be delivered on September 13, 2021 by Vanessa Julye. Her talk is titled “Radical Transformation: Long Overdue for the Religious Society of Friends”

Vanessa Julye (Courtesy of Pendle Hill)

How have Friends collaborated with and sustained the global system of White Supremacy? George Fox, the founder of the Religious Society of Friends envisioned a revolutionary religion which professes the belief that every person has a direct relationship with God. Early Friends proclaimed our capacity for spiritual wholeness comes from the seed of God planted in our hearts. What structures are preventing Friends from living into these beliefs and growing God’s seed?

This year’s lecture is online and free to the public, and we think it will be of interest to some in our peace and conflict studies program. Many thanks to Pendle Hill for their programming and hospitality

Please register for the event and read more about Vanessa Julye and the lecture on the Pendle Hill website…

The Subtlety of Contemporary Racism: Implications for Intergroup Perceptions, Interaction, and Policy

The Subtlety of Contemporary Racism: Implications for Intergroup Perceptions, Interaction, and Policy

A lecture by Jack Dovidio. Dovidio is the Carl Iver Hovland Professor of Psychology at Yale University

Thursday, April 3, 2014

4:30-6:00 p.m.

Science Center 101

Swarthmore College (map)

Dr. Dovidio’s presentation will examine the nature of contemporary racism and explore how subtle, often unintentional bias creates intergroup misunderstanding, erodes trust, and contributes to racial mistrust and disparities. The implications for intervention and policy will also be discussed.

DovidioJack Dovidio is the Carl Iver Hovland Professor of Psychology at Yale University and former Provost and Dean of the Faculty of Colgate University. His work centers around issues of social power and social relations, both between groups and between individuals. He explores both conscious (explicit) and unconscious (implicit) influences on how people think about, feel about, and behave toward others based on group membership. He continues to conduct research on aversive racism, a contemporary subtle form of prejudice, and on techniques for reducing conscious and unconscious biases.

Sponsored by the Department of Psychology and the Office of the President

Latoya Peterson hip-hop feminist and anti-racist blogger

Latoya PetersonThe Pop Culture Hustle

Latoya Peterson, blogger at Racialicious.com, is coming to speak at Swarthmore!

A certified media junkie, Latoya Peterson provides a hip-hop feminist and anti-racist view on pop culture with a special focus on video games, anime, American comics, manga, magazines, film, television, and music.

Tuesday, 11/22 7:00 pm

SCI Center, 199

Hosted by Swarthmore Feminists, Co-sponsored by Forum for Free Speech, Black Studies, BCC, GSST, Islamic Studies, Intercultural Center, Dean’s Office, Political Science, Sociology/ Anthropology, Peace and Conflict Studies, Educational Studies, and the Office of the President