Tag Archives: philosophy

Jill Stauffer’s Ethical Loneliness: The Injustice of Not Being Heard

From our friends at Haverford and including our own Prof. Krista Thomason

Upcoming GPPC / Greater Philadelphia Philosophy Consortium event:

Author Meets Critics:

Jill Stauffer’s Ethical Loneliness: The Injustice of Not Being Heard

Saturday, February 25, 2017,1:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Philipps Wing, Magill Library, Haverford College
Jill Stauffer's Ethical Loneliness cover

Speakers:

  • Macalester Bell (Bryn Mawr)
  • Robert Bernasconi (Penn State)
  • Yannik Thiem (Villanova)
  • Krista Thomason (Swarthmore)1:00:  Welcome, cookies, coffee and tea.
    1:15:  Krista Thomason, Swarthmore College
    1:45:  Yannik Thiem, Villanova University
    2:15:  short break
    2:30:  Macalester Bell (Bryn Mawr College)
    3:00:  Robert Bernasconi (Penn State University)
    3:30:  Jill Stauffer (Haverford College)
    4:00:  Q&A
    4:30:  Wine and cheese reception
    5:30:  End

    Event sponsored jointly by the Greater Philadelphia Philosophy Consortium and Haverford College’s Peace, Justice and Human Rights Program.

Ethical Loneliness – New Book by Jill Stauffer

Congratulations to our colleague, Dr. Jill Stauffer, Director of the Peace, Justice, and Human Rights program at Haverford College on the publication of her new book!

Ethical Loneliness: The Injustice of Not Being Heard

Ethical_LonelinessEthical loneliness is the experience of being abandoned by humanity, compounded by the cruelty of wrongs not being heard. It is the result of multiple lapses on the part of human beings and political institutions that, in failing to listen well to survivors, deny them redress by negating their testimony and thwarting their claims for justice.

Jill Stauffer examines the root causes of ethical loneliness and how those in power revise history to serve their own ends rather than the needs of the abandoned. Out of this discussion, difficult truths about the desire and potential for political forgiveness, transitional justice, and political reconciliation emerge. Moving beyond a singular focus on truth commissions and legal trials, she considers more closely what is lost in the wake of oppression and violence, how selves and worlds are built and demolished, and who is responsible for re-creating lives after they are destroyed.

Jill StaufferStauffer boldly argues that rebuilding worlds and just institutions after violence is a broad obligation and that those who care about justice must first confront their own assumptions about autonomy, liberty, and responsibility before an effective response to violence can take place. In building her claims, Stauffer draws on the work of Emmanuel Levinas, Jean Améry, Eve Sedgwick, and Friedrich Nietzsche, as well as concrete cases of justice and injustice across the world.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Jill Stauffer is associate professor of philosophy and director of the concentration in peace, justice, and human rights at Haverford College. She is the coeditor (with Bettina Bergo) of Nietzsche and Levinas: “After the Death of a Certain God” and has published widely on issues of responsibility within and beyond legality.

 

Making Moral Arguments About Divestment

Making Moral Arguments About Divestment

Hans Oberdiek, Professor Emeritus
Krista Thomason, Assistant Professor
Department of Philosophy

Monday, April 6, 2015
4:30 p.m.
Science Center 199

In conversations about divestment, economic arguments often take center stage. What about the moral arguments? Is divesting the right thing to do? Could there be moral arguments against divestment? Moral philosophers have been making moral arguments since the earliest days of philosophy, so the tools and skills they use can be helpful in thinking about the moral issues surrounding divestment. Join us for a conversation about the moral arguments for and against divestment.

2014-09-22-climate_marchers_nyc

This event is presented by the Philosophy Department and the Peace & Conflict Studies Program

Antisemitism, the Holocaust, and why antisemitism poses a challenge for the Left

We would like to share this announcement about an upcoming event that may be of interest:

Please join us for a talk by Moishe Postone, the Thomas E. Donnelley Professor of History at the University of Chicago, on the Holocaust and anti-Semitism.

Prof. Moishe PostoneOn the basis of a reading of Marx’s social epistemology, Dr. Postone will seek to differentiate antisemitism from other racisms in ways that both explain the ideological frame necessary for the Holocaust and indicates why anti-Semitism poses a particular challenge for the Left.

This talk should be of special interest to students of European and intellectual history; social theory; and Jewish studies.

Thursday, February 28 in the Scheuer Room.

The event will begin at 4:30 p.m. with an introduction by President Chopp.

Sponsored by the President’s Office, the Deans Office, the Cooper Fund, Forum for Free Speech, the Interfaith Center, and the Departments of Religion, History, Political Science, and Sociology & Anthropology

Prof. Krista Thomason on human rights and service learning

Krista ThomasonProf. Krista Thomason will be giving a talk entitled “Philosophy and Human Rights: Scholarship and Activism” at the Pacific Division Meeting of the American Philosophical Association in March 2013. The talk uses PHIL 051 Human Rights and Atrocity as a model for incorporating service learning into philosophy courses. It will feature examples of some of the final projects her students designed in Spring 2012. The talk also examines the ways in which scholarship can inform activism as well as the ways in which scholarship can be a form of activism.

Islam: Reform and Revival

From our friends at Haverford:  A one-day symposium on “Islam: Reform and Revival.”

This will be an opportunity to share in the reflections of four distinguished participants in current debates about the nature of Islam (sponsored  by the Center for Peace and Global Citizenship and the Distinguished Visitor’s Committee). On Thursday, 8 December, in Stokes 106, Abdulkarim Soroush, MohsenKadivar, Ali Mirsepassi, and Mahoud Sadri will be on campus sharing their thoughts and inviting our reflections on contemporary reform in Islam.

  • Professor Soroush has been visiting with us at Haverford this semester;
  • Professor Kadivar is a distinguished Iranian “cleric” and philosopher, who studied with Grand Ayatollah Montazeri in Qum and received his Ph.D. in Islamic Philosophy and Theology  from Tarbiat Modarres University in Tehran.
  • Ali Mirsepassi is Professor of Middle Eastern Studies and Sociology at NYU, and Mahoud Sadri is Professor of Sociology at Texas Woman’s University.

The symposium begins at 9:30 and ends at 4:30 with a break for lunch in the CPCG Cafe.

Download a poster here.

Contact: Prof. Mark Gould