All posts by Lee Smithey

Update on Job Opening: Visiting Faculty in Peace and Conflict Studies

The deadline for applications for this position has been updated to November 5.

The Peace and Conflict Studies Program of Swarthmore College invites applications for an open rank full-time two-year visiting faculty position, beginning Fall 2019.

Scott Arb Rose Garden 01-big


Peace and Conflict Studies Visiting Faculty – Rank Open
Swarthmore College: Peace & Conflict Studies Program
Location: Swarthmore, PA 19081

Description
The Peace and Conflict Studies Program of Swarthmore College invites applications for an open rank full-time two-year visiting faculty position, beginning Fall 2019. Swarthmore College, a highly selective liberal arts college near Philadelphia, is committed to excellence through diversity in its educational program and employment practices and actively seeks and welcomes applications from candidates with exceptional qualifications, particularly those with demonstrable commitment to a more inclusive society and world. Swarthmore College is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Women and minorities are strongly encouraged to apply.

Qualifications
Candidates should demonstrate expertise in peace and conflict studies and the humanities. We welcome geographic expertise besides Europe and the Middle East/North Africa. The successful candidate for the position will be expected to teach four courses per year in our interdisciplinary undergraduate program, including the senior seminar for majors. We seek a candidate with strong teaching and research skills and a knowledge and passion for peace studies that will support student advising and contribute to the development of a dynamic program. The strongest candidates will demonstrate a commitment to creative inclusive teaching and a research program that speak to and motivate undergraduates from diverse backgrounds. A Ph.D. in peace and conflict studies or in another discipline should be in hand by September 2019, accompanied by intellectual and professional engagement in the field of peace and conflict studies.

Full consideration will be given to all applications received by November 5, 2018. Candidates should send a cover letter, including teaching philosophy, experience, and research agenda, a curriculum vitae, a writing sample, and three letters of recommendation.

Application Instructions
For information and to apply, please visit apply.interfolio.com/52772.

 

Meet Tiffany Easthom, Nonviolent Peaceforce Executive Director

Meet and greet Tiffany Easthom
Nonviolent Peaceforce Executive Director

When: Friday, October 12, between 4:30 and 6:00 PM
Where: The Lang Center for Civic and Social Responsibility

Tiffany Easthom
Tiffany Easthom
Executive Director, Nonviolent Peaceforce

Ms. Easthom directed NP’s work in South Sudan before becoming Executive Director. She has made presentations on unarmed civilian protection at the United Nations.

Contact: Clarkson Palmer ctpalmer at aol.com

nonviolentpeaceforcelogo

Israel/Palestine Film Series – Fall 2018

Israel/Palestine Film Series
Fall 2018

Please join us next month for the annual Israel/Palestine Film Series at Swarthmore. There will be screenings for the first six Wednesdays of the semester, and all are free and open to the public (including pizza and refreshments).

All screenings at 4:15PM in the Lang Performing Arts Center Cinema.

film series poster

Organized by Peace and Conflict Studies and Sponsored by the Provost’s Office and the Lang Center for Civic and Social Responsibility


September 5
Frontiers of Dreams and Fears


September 12
Foxtrot


September 19
The War Around Us


September 26
Rock in the Red Zone


October 3
Omar


October 10
The Women’s Balcony

 

 

 

Welcoming Molly Lawrence

The Peace and Conflict Studies program is delighted to welcome Molly Lawrence to our team!

Molly Lawrence
Molly Lawrence

Molly has just begun her new position at Swarthmore as Administrative Assistant for Interdisciplinary programs. Molly comes to us from the Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program as their Think Tank Coordinator. She previously served as Administrative Assistant for the Karrie Gavin Group at Elfant Wissahickon Realtors. Molly has also worked extensively with the Leaders Corps of the University Community Collaborative and she served as an intern at the Urban Institute in Washington, D.C. before that.

Molly graduated from Temple University’s Honors College, with a magna cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa distinctions, and a major in Political Science and minor in Geography and Urban Studies. She was also on Temple’s Dean’s List and has received recognition including the Diamond Award for University and Community Excellence, the Political Science Award for Excellence, and the William Seyler Award. Molly has a wide range of scholarly research contributions as well as community advocacy and leadership experience.

Molly writes, “As a life-long learner with a wide variety of academic interests related to identity, community, and history, I feel very at home in the Interdisciplinary Programs office, helping to connect all these individually important and deeply connected programs of study to ensure that they run smoothly.”

We are honored to have this talented, conscientious, warm, and accomplished addition to Swarthmore’s staff and broader community. Welcome Molly!

 

Course Alert: Spots open for PEAC094: Special Topics – Friends, Peace and Sanctuary

Interested in co-creating a graphic novel about migration with a small group of faculty/staff and individuals resettled to Philadelphia from Syria and/or Iraq? Then consider taking PEAC:094 Friends, Peace, and Sanctuary.

In addition to the course, which will meet at McCabe Library on Wednesdays 1:15-4:00 for the first half of the semester, students will participate in workshops facilitated by local community artist Josh Graupera to create a narrative that will then be illustrated by Eric Battle, who has done work with such companies as Marvel Comics. Students must be able to participate in all three workshops, which will take place at the Lang Center for Civic and Social Responsibility on the afternoons of 9/9, 9/23, and 10/7.

Enrollment is by permission only. Interested students should send a short paragraph to Katie Price (kprice1) and Peggy Seiden (pseiden1) about why they are interested in the course.

participant in Friends Peace Sanctuary course

COURSE DESCRIPTION

PEAC 094: Friends, Peace, and Sanctuary
Instructors: Peggy Seiden & Katie Price
Wednesdays 1:15-4:00 PM | Ends before Fall Break

In this half-credit engaged scholarship course, students will learn about historical and contemporary refugees through a variety of methods, including readings, archival research, and co-creation. As part of the course, students will participate with resettled Iraqis and Syrians and Swarthmore faculty and staff in a series of artist-led workshops in which participants will co-create a graphic novella. The course will include discussions and written reflections based on the readings and workshops.  This course is tied to Friends, Peace, and Sanctuary, a two-year project funded by The Pew Center for Arts and Heritage that brings renowned book artists into conversation with Syrian and Iraqi individuals who have resettled to Philadelphia. Students will be working with and learning directly from project collaborators, and their work may be shared publicly on the Friends, Peace, and Sanctuary website and may also be published or exhibited in Spring 2019.

Limited to five students, by permission of instructors. Course will be taught CR/NC unless otherwise requested. The course will run for the first half of the fall semester.

Job opening: Visiting Faculty in Peace and Conflict Studies

The deadline for applications for this position has been updated to November 5.

The Peace and Conflict Studies Program of Swarthmore College invites applications for an open rank full-time two-year visiting faculty position, beginning Fall 2019.

Scott Arb Rose Garden 01-big


Peace and Conflict Studies Visiting Faculty – Rank Open
Swarthmore College: Peace & Conflict Studies Program
Location: Swarthmore, PA 19081

Description
The Peace and Conflict Studies Program of Swarthmore College invites applications for an open rank full-time two-year visiting faculty position, beginning Fall 2019. Swarthmore College, a highly selective liberal arts college near Philadelphia, is committed to excellence through diversity in its educational program and employment practices and actively seeks and welcomes applications from candidates with exceptional qualifications, particularly those with demonstrable commitment to a more inclusive society and world. Swarthmore College is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Women and minorities are strongly encouraged to apply.

Qualifications
Candidates should demonstrate expertise in peace and conflict studies and the humanities. We welcome geographic expertise besides Europe and the Middle East/North Africa. The successful candidate for the position will be expected to teach four courses per year in our interdisciplinary undergraduate program, including the senior seminar for majors. We seek a candidate with strong teaching and research skills and a knowledge and passion for peace studies that will support student advising and contribute to the development of a dynamic program. The strongest candidates will demonstrate a commitment to creative inclusive teaching and a research program that speak to and motivate undergraduates from diverse backgrounds. A Ph.D. in peace and conflict studies or in another discipline should be in hand by September 2019, accompanied by intellectual and professional engagement in the field of peace and conflict studies.

Full consideration will be given to all applications received by November 5, 2018. Candidates should send a cover letter, including teaching philosophy, experience, and research agenda, a curriculum vitae, a writing sample, and three letters of recommendation.

Application Instructions
For information and to apply, please visit apply.interfolio.com/52772.

 

Social Innovation Lab opens at Lang Center, aims to branch out (Phoenix)

Congratulations to Prof. Denise Crossan and her students!


 

From The Phoenix
3 March 2018
By Abby Young

Social Innovation Lab opens at Lang Center, aims to branch out

In January 2017, the Social Innovation Lab at the Lang Center for Civic and Social Responsibility was created by visiting Lang Center professor Denise Crossan. Its purpose is to extend the Lang Center’s mission to promote engaged scholarship at Swarthmore. Currently, it is being used by groups from Chester and SwatTank as well as some Swarthmore student groups. One of the ways the lab is teaching these concepts is through Design Thinking trainings, which are courses about how to create social projects relating to a particular field of interest. Recently, Crossan and fellows have been promoting the lab as a space for students to visit.

“The Social Innovation Lab creates a space where the campus community can come to apply their deep and thoughtful theoretical knowledge into active practice focused on creating positive social impact.  Learning and practicing problem solving skills within the Social Innovation Lab, such as Design Thinking, allows students to apply their Swarthmore education to complex real-world problems and better equips them for experiences post-graduation,” Crossan said.

Crossan renovated an office space and small library into a maker’s space filled with magnetic whiteboards, markers, crafting supplies, and a bin of cardboard. According to her, the space is designed for the creation of prototypes. Some of the prototypes on display in the lab are colorful, cardboard versions of imagined apps from Crossan’s social entrepreneurship class.

According to Michelle Ma ’20, a University Innovation Fellow who works with the Social Innovation Lab, the space is a natural extension of the classroom. This is an expansion of the Lang Center’s push for engaged scholarship, which is applying classroom learning to solve social issues in the world.

“We really want to push this idea of integrating your studies, what you care about, and making it more,” Ma said.

University Innovation Fellow Mariam Bahmane ’19 said that getting students to come to the lab is a current challenge they are facing. She said that even though Swat students are busy, many have dreams and projects, and the lab wants to create incentives for student attendance to help students find a balance between their studies and ideas for innovation.

“We [are working] to develop a whole spirit of the Social Innovation Lab and programs to get students into the culture of getting out of the library and their books and doing awesome things that they know and they learn about,” Bahmane said.

The maker’s space is still undergoing changes. According to Ma, some of these changes will include decorating the rooms, making the room more colorful, and adding to the currently plain walls. Crossan also said that the windows will have covers that are whiteboards.

“A lot of our efforts right now are focused on designing the space,” Ma said. “A lot of our goals are internal.”

Another goal that Ma emphasized was increased awareness and usage of the space, especially for students.

“We want more people to come in general. I stress this idea to just come and study… just experience the space,” she said.

However, the Social Innovation Lab is not just for individual students. University innovation fellow Natasha Markov-Riss ’20 said the maker’s space is open to any Swarthmore student.

“Individual students and various clubs also frequently inhabit the space — it is open to all. Even if you aren’t currently working on a project, the SIL provides a fantastic study environment,” she wrote.

Crossan said that Swarthmore faculty, staff, and the greater Swarthmore community are also free to use this space, and some groups from Chester are looking to collaborate with the Social Innovation Lab. SwatTank competitors are also encouraged to use the space.

Ma feels that the maker’s space can help faculty members innovate their lesson plans to make them more engaging for students and more applicable to what they care about. She stressed that the fellows at the Social Innovation Lab are eager for people on campus to use the new space that has been created and the supplies that they provide.

“We can’t work towards any necessary goal without people behind it,” she said.

The strategic plan for the first year of function outlines the goals of the Social Innovation Lab as education, experience, execution, and evaluation.

Crossan said that she wants to further educate students about the concepts of  social innovation and entrepreneurship, and creative ways to apply them. One way that the Social Innovation Lab educates is Design Thinking Training, which are courses that teach potential innovators how to apply these abstract concepts. According to Markov-Riss, in the coming weeks, the Social Innovation Lab is running a Design Thinking session for the student group Kinetics.

“We tend to use Design Thinking as an underpinning methodology for students to really deeply understand what … community needs we have,” said Crossan.

Ma said that the Social Innovation Lab wants to help students understand concepts that may be difficult to define or apply to real life.

“We hear a lot about innovation, social change, and entrepreneurship and engaged scholarship but a lot of these terms are abstract. And the SIL wants to be a space where people can put their ideas to action,” Ma said.

According to Crossan, experience is built from engaged scholarship, which is the primary reason that she introduced this space in the Lang Center.

“The Lang Center for Civic and Social Responsibility’s mission is to facilitate engaged scholarship on campus. That means engaging the community, the curriculum, and the campus, collectively,” she said.

This includes collaboration with other separate spaces on campus such as the new Swarthmore MakerSpace overseen by ITS in Beardsley Hall and the college’s libraries. Crossan said that the goal is to create a network of similar spaces throughout campus.

According to Crossan, the execution component of the Social Innovation Lab’s goals is that the maker’s space can be a place to incubate projects.

“One of the goals of the Social Innovation Lab is to create a space where Swarthmore Social Innovators (students, faculty, staff and community) can bring their projects to ‘live’ — that is, find a home, from a few weeks to months, where they can incubate their idea, share experiences with like-minded individuals, and receive dedicated support,” Crossan said.

The goal of evaluation is for students to reflect on their work.

“One of the big intentions for me is how do we take all that we’ve learned from what we do and turn it back into our knowledge,” said Crossan.

The goals of the Social Innovation Lab are part of its goal to help students turn their specialties, regardless of what they are, into social projects. Ma said that as a computer science major, she is developing the Social Innovation Lab’s website. According to Brahmane, her friend is trying to start a business that combines her love of baking and interest in biochemistry.

“With every area of study, there’s some application of your field that you find meaningful … We want to invite more people from all diverse backgrounds of life, whether it be a diverse identity or diverse major,” said Ma.

Despite the fact that the Social Innovation Lab is new, the University Innovation Fellows are positive about its future in cultivating a space for people to participate in engaged scholarship and social entrepreneurship.

“In the coming years, the SIL will become a well-used resource for students — I hope that the SIL is able to connect all of the innovators at Swat and support them as they build projects that reach beyond our campus,” Markov-Riss wrote.

“I see it as the birthplace of the next big entrepreneurs, innovators of the world,” said Brahame. “It would be a great starting spot for brilliance and sustainable big ideas.”

 

War on Humanity: Healthcare under Attack in the Syrian Conflict

The Arabic Section of the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures, the Islamic Studies Program, the Peace and Conflict Studies Program, and the the Health & Societies Program at the Lang Center for Civic and Social Responsibility are pleased to present:

A lecture by Dr. Hani Mowafi, Yale University
War on Humanity: Healthcare under Attack in the Syrian Conflict

Tuesday, March 6, 2018
Scheuer Room at 7:00 p.m.

Alaa Al-Faqir_A damaged hospital in the town of Tel al-Shehab in Deraa, Syria July 23, 2015The Syrian war, now in its 7th year, has been one of the most brutal modern conflicts in the world. With estimates of over half a million deaths since the war’s inception and roughly 13 million displaced the conflict’s effects for Syria and the world will be long lasting. Combatants on all sides but primarily those allied with the Syrian government have used indiscriminate military force against civilian populations. In addition, the deliberate targeting of medical facilities and personnel, in flagrant violation of international law and global norms, has created a new dimension of brutality – one that is being emulated in other conflicts around the world. These violations in the way war is waged have occurred largely with impunity and have grave consequences for the future impact of armed conflict on civilian populations. Dr. Mowafi will discuss some of the unique elements of the Syrian conflict and its impact on civilian populations as well as highlight efforts to combat these developments on both the international and individual level.

Dr_Hani_Mowafi_medDr. Mowafi is an Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine and Chief of the Section of Global Health and International Emergency Medicine at Yale University. His interests are in developing the science and practice of emergency care with emphasis on low- and middle-income countries where the burden of emergency conditions is greatest and is combined with an unmet need for emergency services.  Dr. Mowafi’s current research includes evaluation of health data from a network of hospitals operating inside war-affected Syria and modeling household income effects of road traffic injury in rural Uganda.  He has 15 years of experience in consulting and research in emergency medicine and global public health.

For further information about this event, please contact Khaled Al-Masri: kalmasr1 *at* swarthmore.edu

Philadelphia Nonprofit and Public Service Career Fair

From our friends in Career Services:

Philadelphia Nonprofit and Public Service Career Fair

Date: Friday, March 2, 2018; 1-4pm
Location: Schwartz Fitness and Athletic Center, Bryn Mawr College

The annual Philadelphia Nonprofit and Public Service Career Fair provides a forum for students to learn about a variety of organizations in the nonprofit and public service sectors. Connect with hiring representatives to learn about careers, internships, fellowships, and full-time opportunities.

Swarthmore students are encouraged to attend the workshop on Wed. 2/28 @12:30 in Parrish 159 to help prepare for and make the most of the fair.

This fair is open to all TriCo students. View the list of attending employers in Handshake.

A Swarthmore student who attended recently remarked, “The Non Profit Career Fair jumpstarted my career and showed me a sample of what opportunities are out there in my field. The fair…connected me to multiple organizations looking for…employees. I walked out one step closer to the internship I wound up working for that summer as well as with even more ideas for the future.”

Climate Justice and Civil Rights

Please mark your calendar for an exciting event serving as the capstone for Black History Month and the opening for Women’s History Month:

March 2, 2018

Public Lecture
“Climate Justice and Civil Rights”
1:30-2:30pm: Swarthmore Meeting House

Reception and Gathering
3:30-5:00pm: Black Cultural Center

You are invited to a public lecture and conversation with Jacqueline Patterson, the Director of the NAACP’s Environmental and Climate Justice Program.

Jacqueline Patterson NAACP poster

 

 

 

A national leader who bridges civil rights and environmental justice, Patterson heads the NAACP’s initiatives to advance an inclusive, “just transition” to a renewable, green economy. At the heart of this initiative is Patterson’s commitment to ensuring that communities of color and those who are the most impacted by the harmful effects of climate change are at the center of the movement to create an equitable and sustainable future. Patterson’s long history of leadership has led her to serve as coordinator and co-founder of Women of Color United, and to advocate for the intersection of issues relating to women‘s rights, violence against women, HIV&AIDS, racial justice, economic justice, and environmental and climate justice.

This event is co-sponsored by: Environmental Studies, Lang Center for Civic and Social Responsibility, Black Studies, Black Cultural Center, Gender & Sexuality Studies, Diversity, Inclusion & Community Development, Religious Studies, Peace & Conflict Studies, Political Science, Philosophy, Sociology & Anthropology, Office of the President, Health & Societies Initiative, and the Sustainability Office.