Category Archives: Peace and Conflict Studies

Friends, Peace, and Sanctuary Launch Event

Our friends in the Swarthmore College Library and the Lang Center for Civic and Social Responsibility invite you to join them on Sunday, Nov. 19th from 1:00-4:00 at the Perelman Building at the Philadelphia Museum of Art to learn more about Swarthmore College’s Friends, Peace, and Sanctuary project.

At the event, you can meet the book artists working on the project, connect with potential collaborators, and celebrate the project’s launch with tea, snacks, and art-making.
Friends, Peace, and Sanctuary flyer

Swarthmore College’s Friends, Peace, and Sanctuary will bring together book artists and Syrian and Iraqi individuals who have resettled to Philadelphia. Driven by questions about displacement and refuge, history and experience, the project explores art’s capacity to build empathy and create a deeper sense of belonging.

Working in partnership with the immigrant and refugee service organization Nationalities Service Center, Swarthmore will invite a group of collaborators to work with renowned book artists and participate in multi-day workshops designed to provide access to new creative tools, and to explore various aspects of visual storytelling, artistic expression, and craft. Swarthmore’s library collections—including the Friends Historical Library and the “Peace Collection,” the largest archive of peace-related material in the U.S.—will be made available to book artists to inform their commissioned works, and to collaborators, with materials translated into Arabic.

Both the workshop collaborators and the book artists will create books that highlight the relationship between historical and contemporary stories of displacement. The project will culminate in a series of programs, exhibitions, and an exhibition catalogue that will focus on how archival, academic, and community knowledges can come together to address contemporary issues.

Friends, Peace, and Sanctuary has been supported by The Pew Center for Arts & Heritage and is a collaboration between Swarthmore Libraries and the Lang Center for Civic and Social Responsibility.

UPCOMING WORKSHOP — Weaving the Threads: Intersectionality, Sustainability & Environmental Justice

How do we identify and address intersectional concerns (e.g. from racism, to poverty, to militarism, to homelessness, and more) in our sustainability work and activism? How do we connect our various initiatives within a framework of environmental justice? How do we communicate these visions with others?
On Monday, November 20, join Peace and Conflict Studies and Environmental Studies for a workshop with Prof. Randall Amster, former Executive Director of the Peace and Justice Studies Association.Workshop Flyer

Weaving the Threads: Intersectionality, Sustainability & Environmental Justice

The confluence of contemporary crises represents a direct threat to human existence, yet also a remarkable opportunity to implement alternatives and cultivate visions for a more just and sustainable world. The framework of “climate justice” increasingly subsumes many of these issues and possibilities, providing a basis for transforming our thinking and acting in relation to essential resources including food, water, and energy production. Likewise, critical issues of equity, access, and distribution are brought to the fore, with the nexus of environmental justice and peacebuilding offering potential avenues for change. What theories and actions are informing current movements and responses? How can policymaking and the lived experiences of people and communities equally inform the discourse? How can we promote an ethos of responsibility in both senses of the word, as a form of accountability and a locus of empowerment? Drawing upon examples from local to global scales, this session will seek to spark a collaborative dialogue for cultivating resilient responses to today’s most pressing challenges.

Randall Amster

Randall Amster, J.D., Ph.D., is Director and Teaching Professor in the Program on Justice and Peace at Georgetown University. He serves as Editor-in- Chief of the Contemporary Justice Review. He teaches and publishes widely on subjects including peace and nonviolence, social and environmental justice, political theory and movements, and the impacts of emerging technologies. His recent books include Peace Ecology (Routledge, 2015), Anarchism Today (Praeger, 2012), Lost in Space: The Criminalization, Globalization, and Urban Ecology of Homelessness (LFB, 2008); and the co-edited volume Exploring the Power of Nonviolence: Peace, Politics, and Practice (Syracuse University Press, 2013). His current research interests include environmental peacebuilding, climate justice, intersectionality and ecology, community and sustainability, and the justice implications of contemporary technology.

 

Peace Ecology Book Cover

The workshop begins at 4:15 pm and will take place in Kohlberg Hall, Room 116.

This event is sponsored by Peace and Conflict Studies, Environmental Studies, the Provost’s Office, the President’s Office, and the Office of Sustainability.

From Enemies to Partners: Vietnam, the U.S. and Agent Orange – A Book Talk with the Authors

On Thursday, November 2, Peace and Conflict Studies will welcome the authors of From Enemies to Partners- Vietnam, the U.S. and Agent Orange. The lecture will take place at 4:15 PM in the Scheuer Room of Kohlberg Hall.

Flyer for Book TalkDownload and print a flyer.

Dr. Charles Bailey (Swarthmore ’67) is Director Emeritus of the the Aspen Institute Agent Orange in Vietnam program. Dr. Bailey was the Ford Foundation representative in Vietnam from 1997-2007.

Dr. Le Ke Son is the former Vice Director-General of the Vietnam Environmental Administration. He is also a medical doctor with a PhD in toxicology and served as a medic in the Peoples Army for 25 years.

The authors will cover a range of topics, most notably the great power of technology and military hubris to alter the environment and impact humans even decades later. 

Book cover

Download Information on the Book Release

This event is cosponsored by Asian Studies, Sociology and Anthropology, the Office of Alumni and Parent Engagement, Environmental Studies, and the Global Affairs Program at the Lang Center for Civic and Social Responsibility. 

 

 

Provost of Brown University, Dr. Richard Locke, Will Visit Swarthmore on November 3, 2017

Rick Locke Flyer

Richard M. Locke is provost of Brown University and professor of political science and public and international affairs. At the time of his appointment as provost in July 2015, Locke served as the Howard R. Swearer Director of the Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs at Brown.

Locke is an internationally respected scholar and authority on international labor relations and worker rights, comparative political economy, and corporate responsibility. He has published five books and numerous articles on economic development, labor relations, and corporate responsibility. For his ongoing research on fair and safe working conditions in global supply chains, Locke was named the 2005 Faculty Pioneer in Academic Leadership by The Aspen Institute. He is a member of the ILO-IFC Better Work Program Advisory Committee, and from 2013-2016, he served as chair of the Apple Academic Advisory Board, a group of independent academics who worked with Apple to improve labor conditions among the company’s suppliers.

This lecture, titled Making Globalization Work For All, is sponsored by Peace and Conflict Studies, the President’s Office, and the Provost’s Office.

Faculty Votes Unanimously to Approve Regular Major in Peace and Conflict Studies

Following the unanimous vote of the faculty, the College has now formally approved a Regular Major in Peace and Conflict Studies here at Swarthmore. Toward the end of the 19th century (1888 to be exact), the first course in peace studies anywhere in the world was taught here at Swarthmore, and our program was established in 1991. The Peace Collection and Friends Historical Library have been supporting peace research since 1930 and 1871 respectively. Now, the study of peace and conflict has been formally incorporated into the College’s curriculum!

Congratulations!

Peace and Conflict Studies Welcomes Prof. Jo-Anne Hart on October 23, 2017

Peace and Conflict Studies at Swarthmore is proud to welcome Dr. Jo-Anne Hart for a public lecture on Monday, October 23, 2017.

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Jo-Anne Hart is adjunct professor at the Watson Institute and professor at Lesley University in Cambridge, MA. She graduated from UCLA and received a  fellowship to study Persian language at NYU, where she also received a PhD in political science. She specializes in US security in the Persian Gulf, with particular reference to Iran. In addition to Lesley, she has taught at Brown, the Naval War College in Newport, RI, and Barnard College.

Hart also works as a practitioner in international conflict resolution: she is active with the international NGO Search for Common Ground, where she also serves on the Board of Directors. She has worked with the US military for more than a decade. Hart has convened a US-Iranian working group on avoiding incidents at sea in the Persian Gulf and regularly participates in trainings with the US Army on mutual threat reduction in the Gulf. Hart has years of experience in simulations, in security decision making exercises both as a participant at the national level and in designing simulations to support her own teaching. She gives briefings to senior military leaders and has lectured widely in the US and abroad. At Lesley, she teaches Contemporary Middle East History as well as courses on technology and global learning.

Her lecture, Field Notes from Two Decades Pursuing Conflict Transformation Between the US and Iran, asks the following:

Why has it been so difficult to ease the longstanding hostility between the US and Iran despite mutual interests which could be well served?

Speaking from her own experience taking part in unofficial, so-called Track Two, talks with Iranian negotiators since 1996, Prof. Hart will illustrate the process of seeking conflict resolution. Hart will describe the back-channel process she initiated with Iranians and other key stakeholders in the Persian Gulf to avoid a naval incident at sea in those crowded and critical waters.

The lecture begins at 7:00PM and will be held in the Scheuer Room of Kohlberg Hall. 

This event is cosponsored by Arabic, Islamic Studies, Political Science, Sociology and Anthropology, and the Lang Center for Civic and Social Responsibility.

 

 

WHAT HAPPENED IN CHARLOTTESVILLE? A Teach-in on October 5, 2017

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Peace and Conflict Studies faculty member Lee Smithey will be joined by Bruce Dorsey (History), Nina Johnson (Sociology and Black Studies), Jamie Thomas (Linguistics), and Gina Patnaik (English Literature) for a panel discussion on the recent violence in Charlottesville, VA.

The event will take place on Thursday, October 5 at 6:00pm in the Lang Performing Arts Center Cinema. 

Teach-In Flyer

Human Rights Hummus: A Podcast Produced by Peace and Conflict Studies Alumni

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Swarthmore Peace and Conflict Studies recent graduates Lily Tyson and Marissa Cohen have already produced three episodes of their new podcast, “Human Rights Hummus: Voices of the Holy Land.”

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Lily and Marissa interview Israelis and Palestinians and record their stories, teaching listeners “what their lives are like and about what is going on with this occupation today, as they experience it.”

Swarthmore College, the Lang Center for Civic & Social Responsibility,  and Prof. Sa’ed Atshan of the Peace and Conflict Studies program all proudly support Lily and Marissa on this project!

Check out their website here.

Maria Castaneda ’18, Dreaming at Swarthmore

Maria CastanedaThe Peace and Conflict Studies Program stands with our student, Maria Castaneda ’18, who was featured in a story this week in the Philadelphia Inquirer.

Maria is pursuing a special major in Spanish and Peace and Conflict Studies, and we appreciate all she contributes to our intellectual and campus community.


“She was 3 years old when she left central Mexico in her mother’s arms, unknowingly embarked on a dangerous journey north. They were part of a group that crossed the border on foot in Arizona, then headed east by car to North Carolina, where her father had settled after a similar trek.

Today, at 22, Castaneda has achieved a true American dream: She’s a senior at Swarthmore College, succeeding at one of the nation’s elite schools and on track to a fulfilling career in education or law.

Now, she’s wondering if it will all be stripped”  Read more…


There is a great deal of insecurity at the moment over the future of the DACA program, and we wish to express our support for all of our undocumented students.

 

Swarthmore Peace and Conflict Studies Students in the News

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Peace and Conflict Studies special major Maria Castaneda ’18 and Peace and Conflict Studies minor Michael Nafziger ’18 were recently featured in the news.

Read Maria’s story related to President Trump’s order ending the DACA program here.
“From Mexico to Swarthmore, a dream now in danger”

Follow Michael’s involvement in our community in the wake of the alt-right controversy in Charlottesville, VA here.
“Swarthmore Community Reflects on Charlottesville at Collection”