Tag Archives: students & alumni

Olivia Ensign ’12 and the Quaker United Nations Office

by Olivia Ensign ’12

 

Olivia Ensign '12 and the Quaker United Nations OfficeAs a senior I decided to take on the challenge of a double credit thesis to fulfill the requirements of my Peace and Conflict Studies honors minor. I chose to write my thesis on the evolution and intersection of the fields of Security Studies and Peace and Conflict Studies. This topic was the culmination of four years of seminars and individual inquiry. Completing this work, eventually titled “Separated at Birth: An Analysis of the Origins and Evolution of Peace and Conflict Studies and Security Studies,” was simultaneously the most draining and rewarding experience of my time at Swarthmore.  My continued interest in the theories and applications of Peace and Conflict Studies led me to apply for my current position as a Program Assistant with the Quaker United Nations Office. This yearlong fellowship has so far been an amazing experience.

 

The Quaker United Nations Office represents the interests of Quakers worldwide at the United Nations. Much of QUNO’s work consists of facilitating informal, off the record dialogue among relevant stakeholders on the role of the UN in peacebuilding and prevention efforts. In addition to helping plan and execute these meetings, my role as a Program Assistant consists of monitoring developments in the work of the Peacebuilding Commission in Burundi and the Democratic Republic of Congo. I also track developments in UN action in Iran and Iraq. My duties include attending relevant meetings at the U.N. as well as monitoring academic journals and news sources in order to gather information on the issues QUNO engages around. Another area of work I am engaged on is the Palestinian bid for an upgraded status at the UN. This work includes updating the Palestine Resource, an online database intended to be a source of information for activists engaged around the issue of Palestinian statehood, and attending meetings of the Israel-Palestine NGO working group. Finally, I work on QUNO’s engagement around the Post 2015 Development Agenda, the framework that will replace the MDGs upon their expiration.

 

My work with QUNO has reaffirmed my interest in the role of international organizations and international law. As a result I decided to apply for law school with the aim of completing a degree in international human rights law.

 

Adriana Popa ’12 – Blog Post

Adriana Popa '12 - Blog PostAdriana Popa ’12, honors Political Science major and Peace and Conflict studies minor from Pitesti, Romania, is heading to India after graduation, to work under the Davis Projects For Peace Award. The $10,000 Davis grant will support the efforts she and fellow Swattie Riana Shah ’14, from Ahmedabad, India, Sociology/Anthropology and Educational Studies major and co-founder (along with Jwalin Patel) of Independent Thought and Social Action – ITSA, will center around peace education and community building. The project, You(th) for Peace, will promote cross-cultural dialogue and help combat stereotypes, fear, and intolerance, allowing students and their families to envision a common future of peace and cooperation, and will encompass 10 weeks of educational and social action components in India, as well as an international component (through the international team that will join Adriana and Riana in India, the culminating conference, the series of Youtube videos and the curriculum translated into multiple languages that will be launched at the conclusion of activities in India). Adriana and Riana hope the spirit and model of You(th) for Peace will be replicated in various parts of the world. Adriana will draw on her extensive experience in promoting education, youth involvement and peace through her past work with organizations such as the Federation of Young European Greens, Genocide Intervention Network, Peace Child International, and Africa Change International, while Riana will add You(th) for Peace to her already rich experience in advancing independent thinking, social activism, and entrepreneurship to counter the passivity of the Indian education system. Adriana and Riana both have a great deal to thank Swarthmore for in regards to their interest and involvement with education and peace work. Adriana’s Peace and Conflict Studies experience has been one of the most formative ones in her life: “For years I had associated war with a pointed gun and peace with its absence. Through my education, I came to understand that war begins far away from the ammunition warehouses, the same place where peace is born: in people’s hearts and minds. Peace begins with understanding, and education is the best tool for that.” Riana benefited from several generous Swarthmore grants, including the Lang Opportunity Scholar Grant from the Lang Center for Civic and Social Responsibility, which have contributed to her perspective on a potential avenue of involvement: “The curriculum in many Indian schools is test-driven and rote-memorization based, creating an environment which doesn’t offer students a chance to intensely participate in critical thinking, which is something that Swarthmore prizes and encourages.”Adriana Popa '12 - Blog Post

 

Peace and Conflict Studies Minor Sponsored Externship

Hello,

My name is Kassandra Sparks and the Peace and Conflict Studies department recently sponsored my externship at Center for Resolutions. Jennifer Magee recommended I let you know about my experience, in case other students and alumni are interested in the opportunities the Peace and Conflict Studies department is presenting students here. Below, I have written up a small blurb outlining my experience thus far. If you have any more questions or would like any more information, please let me know! I have also attached a picture of myself with Bridget Caroll, the woman who spoke to my Introduction to Peace and Conflict Studies class, in her office at the Center.

I became involved with Center for Resolutions in November thanks to taking Jennifer Magee’s Introduction to Peace and Conflict Studies class. Jennifer invited Bridget Carroll from Center for Resolutions to speak to our class about the work the Center does in restorative justice, mediation, and dispute settlement. So inspired by the work she was doing, I contacted her and have been volunteering there since. The Center is an engaging, stimulating, fast-paced environment to work in, and as opened my eyes to the realities of non-profit organizations. Since there are only three paid staff members, I have the opportunity to (like them) take on multiple hats and truly make a difference in my community. A few of the responsibilities I have had are the following:

  • searching for and writing grants
  • compiling and analyzing data about the Center
  • contacting police liaisons
  • designing a website
  • assisting the Center’s push to be more active in social media
  • and so many more

The skills I have learned from the short months I have been interning at the Center have been incredible, and I can only imagine how much more I will learn over the following years at Swarthmore. I feel so much more prepared both to apply for summer internships this summer as well as to apply these skills in my internship.

I am extremely grateful for both the Peace and Conflict Studies program and the Lang Center for exposing my to this opportunity, sponsoring my externship, and funding my transportation. Peace and Conflict Studies Minor Sponsored Externship
Thank you again,
Kassandra Sparks

 

Meghan Auker Becker ’11, Joan B. Kroc Institute for Peace and Justice Intern

Meghan Auker Becker '11, Joan B. Kroc Institute for Peace and Justice Intern

The day I graduated from Swarthmore, I had no idea what my future would look like.  I held in my hands a diploma and a plane ticket, but no solid plans as to what to do with either.  Now, six months later, I am at a place in my life I never would have predicted but one that I nonetheless have come to love.

 

Directly following graduation, I decided to trek off to Europe with nothing but a backpack and a Eurail pass (cliche, I know, but well worth the effort).  After three months of traveling across the continent and seeing so many beautiful countries and places, I moved to San Diego where I had been awarded a fellowship at the Joan B. Kroc Institute for Peace and Justice.  There I, along with three other interns, followed the news from about a dozen foreign countries and wrote and published a weekly update where we informed our readers about conflict zones, peace efforts, and social justice events that had happened in our assigned countries the week before.  We were also each assigned an individual project to work on, so throughout the fall I also worked on mapping peacebuilding efforts worldwide to better understand the resources, approaches, and projects implemented in this emerging field.

 

While these daily assignments kept us busy, perhaps one of the most interesting parts of the internship was being involved with the different programs, symposiums, and conferences IPJ sponsored.  During the first half of the term, we were able to meet and collaborate with Women PeaceMakers and PeaceWriters – international leaders who are invited to San Diego to share their stories and exchange ideas and approaches to peacemaking and social justice. This year, we were honored to meet the first woman Prime Minister of Haiti, a lawyer for Dalat rights in India, a doctor and relief organizer in Iraq, and (maybe, just maybe) the next President of Kenya.  We also worked on the “Women, Media, and Revolution” public forum where journalists, filmmakers and social media citizen activists discussed the role of women in conflict and how they are using their voices against ongoing political and cultural violence, and most recently presented a lecture by Katherine Sikkink on how human rights prosecutions are changing world politics.

 

The IPJ is part of the University of San Diego’s graduate school of Peace Studies, so in addition to our work, we were also able to audit classes, attend lectures, and meet with faculty and professors throughout the semester.  It was a great way to transition out of full-time academic life: we were able to stay involved and engaged in academic topics and issues, but weren’t required to do homework or take final exams!

 

I was lucky in that I was able to directly use my degree in Peace and Conflict Studies for my work at the Institute for Peace and Justice (see – they even sound similar!).  Having a firm grasp on history and a clear understanding of theories and practices was completely beneficial in the general sense, and more specific things like having access to the Nonviolent Action database and a connection at the Swat-founded Genocide Prevention Network helped me with my journal articles and peacebuiling research.

 

My first six months as a college graduate have been such an adventure and working at the IPJ has been a great experience.  While I’m not sure what the next six months hold or where this work will take me, I couldn’t be more excited to find out.

 

Peace and Conflict Studies students and alumni 2003-2011

PCS students and Swarthmore alumni apply their interests and knowledge in service, research, vocation, and further education.

Nida Atshan ’12

Nida Atshan ’12 is spending her 2010 summer in Washington, D.C. working with two programs. She is participating in the Institute for International Public Policy (IIPP) Sophomore Summer Policy Institute at Howard University. (Nida was recently awarded an IIPP Fellowship which provides minority students with multiple years of support to attend graduate school in international affairs). She is also interning at the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR), a D.C.-based think tank devoted to rigorous research on the needs of women across the globe, and Nida is specifically working on issues of Middle Eastern women’s empowerment.

Lauren Stern ’12

Lauren Stern ’12 has been awarded an S2A2 grant from the Lang Center to serve as an unpaid intern with the Jewish Dialogue Group in Philadelphia. She will help to create a publication about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict for Jewish organizations and individuals around the U.S. She hopes to address how Jews can systematically consider how to respond to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict in the most effective and ethical ways possible (through advocacy, education, financial donations, direct service, direct action, and other means). Stern’s two main tasks will be to research questions about the history of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, analyze the current situation from multiple ideological perspectives, and conduct and summarize interviews with activists, teachers, and scholars from a wide range of perspectives. Next year, Lauren will study in Israel, where she plans  to serve another non-profit organization and continue to examine both the conflict and Jewish identity constructed in relation to it. She hopes to use both these experiences to contrast and understand the conflict from the angle of organizations centered around peace, dialogue, and identity.

Kevin Kim ’10 will teach human rights and justice

In mid June Kevin will be going to Princeton where he has been hired by the Center for Talented Youth at Johns Hopkins as a teacher’s assistant for a course on human rights and justice .

Kevin has also been chosen by the United Nations Association of the United States of America (UNAUSA) to help staff their upcoming middle school and high school conferences at the United Nations Headquarters in New York. In mid April, he will be serving as the Director for the IAEA event, where middle school students from around the world will be debating the issue of securing nuclear materials. Then in mid-May I’ll be serving as the Director for the WFP event, where high school students will debate issues concerning malnutrition.

Ivan Boothe ‘05 joined the board of the Peace and Justice Studies Association

Peace and Conflict Studies students and alumni 2003-2011Ivan Boothe ’05 splits his time between the Fellowship of Reconciliation and Casino-Free Philadelphia. At FOR, he is the online communications manager, writing emails and action alerts to members and redeveloping FOR’s website. At Casino-Free Philly, Ivan is an organizer who has led trainings in nonviolent direct action, as well as maintaining the group’s website and presence on social networks like Facebook and Twitter. He is the co-organizer of Philadelphia NetSquared, which brings together nonprofits, activists and techies to develop connections between the social web and social change. He is the social networking chair on the board of the Peace and Justice Studies Association and serves on the American Friends Service Committee Nobel Peace Prize nominating committee.

Jennifer Trinh ’11 founded the student group SwatCambodia

Jennifer Trinh ’11 founded the student group SwatCambodia two years ago to provide information about the country’s recent past and to raise money and build houses for homeless families there. Read more about SwatCambodia.

 

Samia Abbass ’11 is participating in the college’s Northern Ireland Semester in Derry / Londonderry this fall.

Students in the program are enrolled at the University of Ulster and Samia is taking classes on international politics, and the government and politics of Northern Ireland. In addition to attending lectures and trips organized by the program’s field directors, she is also interning with Swarthmore professor Teya Sepinuck on the Theatre of Witness production that will premier in October at the Playhouse. Developed by Teya, Theatre of Witness is an innovative style of multimedia dramatic production that bridges theatre and social justice by giving the victims of conflict and trauma a voice, and allowing them to bear witness to their suffering. An avid photographer, Samia is also working on a research project with Prof. Lee Smithey and Prof. Gregory Maney (Hofstra University) to map and analyze changing themes and placement of murals in West Belfast.

Amy Kapit ’06 is pursuing a Ph.D. in International Education with an emphasis in identity, political preferences, and peace education

Amy Kapit ’06 is now in the second year of her PhD program, studying International Education at New York University. Along with working as a teaching assistant and a research assistant, she is developing her dissertation proposal and looking into researching the relationship between identity and political preferences, primarily as they relate to support for particular foreign policies. She is also interested in the way that peace education programs and intra-communal dialogue and debate can influence this relationship. Amy plans to focus her research on the Middle East.

Sa’ed Atshan ’06 is a lecturer in peace and justice studies at Tufts University

Sa’ed is a joint doctoral candidate in anthropology and Middle Eastern studies at Harvard University. He received an MPP from the Harvard Kennedy School of Government in 2008, where he was a Jack Kent Cooke Scholar, chair of student government elections, and class marshal. He also received his BA fromSwarthmore College in 2006, where he was a Lang Scholar, Mellon Fellow, student government representative, and a visiting student at the American University inCairo and the American University in Beirut. Sa’ed has worked for the American Civil Liberties Union, the UN High Commission on Refugees, Human Rights Watch, Seeds of Peace, the Palestinian Negotiations Affairs Department, and the Government of Dubai. He is presently a lecturer in peace and justice studies at Tufts University, and he is a three-time recipient of distinction awards from Harvard for his work as a head teaching fellow there. Sa’ed was born in the US to a Palestinian refugee family, and was raised in theOccupied Territories. He plans a career in scholarship and public advocacy.

Nick Martin ’04
UPEACE/US Executive Director Selected as International Youth Foundation Global Fellow

Nick Martin

(from http://www.upeaceus.org/

UPEACE/US Executive Director and Peace Education ’04 Alum, Nick Martin was recently selected as a 2009 Global Fellow by the International Youth Foundation for his role in founding the DCPEACE program and his track record as a young social entrepreneur. Nick joins 19 other international fellows aged 18-29 who were chosen from a pool over 500 applicants and is one 3 fellows to have been selected from the United States.

The International Youth Foundation builds and maintains a worldwide community of businesses, governments, and civil society organizations committed to empowering youth to be healthy, productive, and engaged citizens. Read the Press Release here.

In the spring of 2008, UPEACE/US launched DCPEACE, an initiative to empower teachers, youth, and families with the skills and knowledge necessary to effectively serve as peacebuilders in their communities, as well as PeaceRooms, a program that connects classrooms of middle school students from Costa Rica and Washington D.C. through the use of innovative virtual networking technology and for the purpose of developing core concepts of global citizenship and conflict transformation, and peace education. Both programs leverage the skills, resources, ideals, and networks of the wider UPEACE system in order to transform the way that students and communities deal with conflict. Read More.

Nick said of his experience in creating the programs: “The UPEACE Peace Education MA Programme and the Centre for Executive Education were absolutely instrumental in helping me to build skills related to nonprofit management, social entrepreneurship, and peace education content and pedagogy.”

The programs have been met with tremendous success and UPEACE/US is currently working with the Omar Dengo Foundation in Costa Rica to pilot a four-school version of the Peace Rooms Program.

For more information about the fellowship and to read about the other fellows visit YouthActionNet.

 

 


2006-2007

Katie Camillus ’08 to initiate a micro-finance program in Uganda

Having interned last summer at Kiva.org and working with microfinance organizations, Camillus is using her Lang Opportunity Scholarship at Swarthmore to initiate and study a social justice project in Uganda in cooperation with Project Have Hope . You can follow her work this summer via her blog .

Jared Leiderman ’05 to enter graduate school at Harvard University

Starting in fall 2007, Jared will attend the JFK School of Government at Harvard on a Reynolds Foundation Fellowship in Social Entrepreneurship.

Jared Leiderman ’05 is currently serving as a Fellow with the Insight Collaborative

As one of three 2006 Insight Fellows, I have the opportunity to provide real and sustainable assistance to numerous organizations worldwide by applying advanced conflict management, effective communication, and negotiation theories and techniques. The Fellowship includes a $20,000 expense allowance to support three months of intense training in the field and nine months of international travel to apply that knowledge to humanitarian contributions. Each Fellow designs 3 three-month international placements that are spurred by guidelines that include entrepreneurship, communication, sustainability, and self-reflection. Currently, each Fellow will spend one placement at the International Criminal Court in The Hague, working as a special consultant to the Chief Prosecutor and his immediate staff. I will then travel to Uganda to assist the Northern Uganda Peace Initiative’s forum on reconciliation and provide consulting services to enhance its internal communications. And finally, in the Spring, I will work with Partners-Jordan to design, create, and launch a new mediation program. Other Fellows have focused on reconciliation in Cyprus, micro-economic development in Uganda, improving education in China, and post-Khmer Rouge justice in Cambodia.

 

Each Fellow keeps journals of their experiences, thoughts, and reflections which are posted online and produces a presentation and report around a central theme at the end of the Fellowship. In addition, pursuant to the guideline of Sustainability, the Fellows must fundraise to “refill the pot” to keep that position available for the following year’s Fellows.

 

For more information, please visit: www.insightcollaborative.org or get in touch with me via Professor Lee Smithey.

Starting in fall 2007, Jared will attend the JFK School of Government at Harvard on a Reynolds Foundation Fellowship in Social Entrepreneurship.

Zsaleh Harivandi ’07 spent six weeks this summer in a small village in northeast Ghana

Zsaleh Harivandi ’07 spent six weeks this summer in a small village in northeast Ghana with Operation Crossroads Africa. She worked on a women’s development project which involved setting up a mill with local village women; helping roast, mill, and package “Nutrifood”; organizing a system for rural women to sell Nutrifood, thereby increasing their income; and promoted nutrition in surrounding villages. Zsaleh also spoke at First Collection this year.

 Amy Kapit ’06 writes for Israel Policy Forum

Amy Kapit ’06, a recent Honors Peace and Conflict Studies graduate will soon become Director of Programs at Meretz USA . She is currently completing an internship at the Israel Policy Forum where she has contributed to the organization’s weekly analysis with a piece on the tenuous ceasefire in Lebanon .

Meretz USA for Israeli Civil Rights and Peace is a US non-profit organization that supports a genuine peace between the State of Israel and its neighbors [including the Palestinian people] based on a negotiated land-for-peace solution.

You can read an article, “The ‘Martyr’ Part 2”, derived from her senior Religion thesis on the Meretz USA blog.

 Camillus ’08 joins Peace and Justice Studies Association Board

Katie Camillus ’08, a new student in the PCS program, will be joining the board of the Peace and Justice Studies Association as its student liaison.

Lang Opportunity Grant winner Katie Camillus ’08 and Swarthmore’s tradition of student activism are featured on a recent broadcast of Wisconsin Public Radio’s “Here on Earth.” Listen here. Find Swarthmore references at min. 15, 21, and 47 (Katie’s interview).

 


2005-2006

 Theresa Williamson ’97

posted 10-24-05

The Power of Grassroots Communities in Brazil and Around the World: The Potential of Connecting Them Through New Technologies

A talk by Theresa Williamson ’97
Tuesday, October 25th at 7:30 p.m.
Scheuer Room, Kohlberg Hall

On Tuesday, October 25th, Theresa Williamson ’97 will be at Swarthmore College to speak about her work with low-income communities in Brazil.

Ms. Williamson spent the last few years founding Catalytic Communities* http://www.catcomm.org/ , a not-for-profit, non-governmental organization (NGO). Catalytic Communities develops resources useful to low-income communities in their effort to plan and carry out their own innovative community improvement projects by offering internet database and network services. In her current role, she is CatComm’s primary fundraiser (responsible for all major gift solicitations, small donor cultivation, and special events), liaison to the Board of Directors, and oversees staff responsible for day-to-day organizational management and oversight. Theresa also oversees all program strategy, development and activity. In May 2004 Theresa received her Ph.D. from the Department of City and Regional Planning at the University of Pennsylvania which will yield a book about Catalytic Communities’ development. It is entitled “Catalytic Communities: The Birth of a Dot Org” and was one of three finalists for the 2004 Barclay Gibbs Jones Award for the Best Dissertation in Planning. She has published articles from this dissertation and related research in Progressive Planning, The Journal of Urban Technology, and Cidadania.org. Prior to her doctoral research and decision to found CatComm, Theresa had already been active in a number of movements for years, since the early age of 12. Over the years she worked for or volunteered with: Jeremy Rifkin, of the Foundation for Economic Trends; Colman McCarthy, of the Center for Teaching Peace; Co-op America; the Child Welfare League of America; the Philadelphia Recycling Office; the Ombudsman for the State of Paraná, Brazil; and S.E.A., Students for Environmental Action (Maryland). Theresa’s undergraduate degree was in Biological Anthropology, with concentrations in Environmental Studies and Peace and Conflict Studies , from Swarthmore College. Though raised in the Washington, DC area, Theresa is a dual Brazilian and British citizen.

*Catalytic Communities (CatComm) was founded in 2000 as a not-for-profit in both the USA and Brazil, having arisen from the recognition that somewhere in the world there exists a tailored community solution to virtually any mentionable social or environmental challenge: from HIV to water contamination, housing to cultural preservation, unemployment to lack of political mobilization. Unfortunately the tailored local solutions that exist in communities all around us have historically been isolated and undervalued. Our organization works to create spaces – physical and virtual – designed to empower and inspire a global network of community-generated solutions.

 Ivan Boothe ’05

posted October 13, 2005

Ivan Boothe serves as the Communications Director for the Genocide Intervention Fund , and he presented a paper, “Privilege and Nonviolent Intervention in the Context of Empire,” at the 2005 meetings of the Peace and Justice Studies Association . The paper is co-authored with Lee Smithey and is derived in large part from Ivan’s senior thesis on transnational nonviolent empowerment and third party nonviolent intervention.

update August 29, 2006

Boothe and Smithey’s paper will appear soon in Peace and Change.

Boothe, Ivan and Lee A. Smithey. Forthcoming. “Privilege, Empowerment, and Nonviolent Intervention.” Peace and Change.

Amy Kapit ’06

posted September 18, 2005

Amy received the Julia and Frank Lyman Student Summer Research Fellowship for the summer of 2005. The fellowship was established to support students in independent research or unpaid internships. Amy spent the summer working for the Education for Peace in Iraq Center (EPIC) in Washington, DC. While there, she acted as the Dispatch Coordinator, writing news summaries to highlight some of the most important stories in the ongoing war. The majority of her work focused on researching trends in Iraqi civilian deaths and on following the constitutional process.

Marissa Vahlsing ’06

posted September 16, 2005

Marissa recently received a Truman Scholarship: a national award that recognizes leadership skills, a committment to public service and academic excellence. Marissa hopes to use this award to attend law school for human rights law; a decision that she came to while studying human rights and social movements last year with the International Honors Program in England, Tanzania, India, New Zealand and Mexico. This past summer, Marissa researched dissent from the war on Terror among NYC activist groups, and will use this research to generate a Peace and Conflict studies thesis on Power and the Production of Truth in the War on Terror. She has also secured an internship in DC for the summer of 2006 with the International Labor Rights Fund (ILRF)

 


2004-2005

Elizabeth Anderson ’05

posted February 11, 2005

Elizabeth Anderson ’05, a Swarthmore College senior from Saint Joseph, Mich., [and a Peace and Conflict Studies minor] is among the 12 recipients nationwide for the 2005-2006 George J. Mitchell Scholarship. The first Swarthmore student ever to receive a Mitchell award, she will study for a Master’s degree in ecumenics at Trinity College in Dublin. Read more …

 

Anna Morgan ’04

posted February 11, 2005

Anna Morgan (pictured far left) has joined the Quaker U.N. Office as a Program Assistant. Anna graduated from Swarthmore College in May, 2004 with a B.A. in Political Science and minors in Peace and Conflict Studies and Asian Studies. While at Swarthmore, she served as the Co-President of the Student Council, held leadership positions in various diversity-related organizations, and helped to found and clerk the student Quaker organization. Anna also worked as an intern in the American Embassy, Madrid. She grew up attending Orange County Friends Meeting in southern California.


2003-2004

Matt Williams ’04

posted June 9, 2004

From this August to next June, I will be working under a Fulbright grant with the Law School and the School of Public Policy and Management at Qinghua University in China to research:

1.) The rise of a new legal elite in China (lawyers, prosecutors, judges, legal experts), where they are from in China, where they were educated, and how they interact with one another (i.e. where the main forms of discourse occur between government and non-government legal entities).
2.) What impact this new class of legal experts is having on the common Chinese citizen who is largely unaware of their legal rights. Are they pushing the threshold? Are the new legal aid centers at universities being used? How much information about constitutional change reaches the impoverished in the countryside?
3.)What implications does this potential change in attitude toward government accountability and legal know-how have for the rise of some form of civil society in China in the decades to come?

Jared Leiderman ’05

posted June 9, 2004

This summer I will be working at the Joan B. Kroc Institute for Peace and Justice (IPJ) at the Uni versity of San Diego. (peace.sandiego.edu ) By taking a number of different news sources from the area and around the world, I will put together a number of short, informative articles for the IPJ’s weekly publication. I’ll work closely with Executive Director Dr. Joyce Neu and Deputy Director Dr. Dee Aker for these weekly reports. I will also work with them on organizing and promoting specialized programs such as the Women PeaceMakers Program and WorldLink. The WPP facilitates dialogue s among individual women working to promote peace and equal gender roles in areas of conflict around the world by bringing them to the IPJ for two months at a time. It also documents the womens’ personal experiences through video, writing, and audiotape. WorldLink is a program directed at bringing high school youth from San Diego, Los Angeles, and Tijuana, Mexico, together to “promote international awareness and understanding among high school students.” (www.youthworldlink.org ) Finally, I will present on my research and personal ideas to the staff at the end of the internship. My research is funded by the Summer of Service Internship at the Lang Center.

See weekly updates by Kroc Institute interns and Jared’s bio.

Sheena Johnson ’05

posted June 21, 2004

I am working as an intern in the D.C. office of Search for Common Ground, an international conflict transformation organization . I am working with their Sub-Sahara Africa Program. Currently, they have programs in five countries in Africa. Their motto is: “Understand the differences, Act on the commonalities.” They are known around the world for using media (such as radio and tv programs) as a tool for peace building.Thier mission is very ambitious: to transform the way the world deals with conflict. We emphasize cooperative solutions, pursed on a realistic scale and with practical means.

Marissa Vahlsing ’06

posted June 9, 2004

I have recieved a Summer of Service Internship Grant (SOSI), and I am interning at the National Labor committee in NYC, which is a group that advocates for workers rights in the developing world, particularly for those who work in factories managed by US multi-national corporations. My role in this has been to carry out research about those American corporations who are on the ground in Bangladesh and employing mostly young girls in their factories who are without any enforcable labor rights. We are currently working with various large companies like the GAP, H&M, Nike and Sears and have succeeded in having them agree to give more rights to their workers.

Debbie Cohen ’06

posted June 13, 2004

This summer, I’ll be working at a small Jewish camp called Galil in Bucks County, PA, where I’ve been going for quite a few years now. The camp belongs to an organization called Habonim Dror North America (www.habonimdror.org ), and the pillars of the organization are socialism, social justice, judaism, zionism, and actualization. Our primary concern at camp is informal education, and we hope to impart our values to the kids, especially about peace and justice in the middle east as well as the US and respecting and sharing with everyone through fun activities, group building, and sharing the physical labor responsibilities that keep the camp running.

Professor Ted Herman (1913-2010) Swarthmore class of 1935

Ted Herman, an important figure in the development of Peace Studies, recently passed away.  Prof. Herman lived not far from Swarthmore and was well known in the area.  We would like to share this tribute from another major peace studies scholar, Dr. Ian Harris, and express our appreciation and condolences to Prof. Herman’s friends, family, and colleagues.

Ted Herman (1913-2010)

Prof. Lee Smithey, Nobel laureate Mairead Corrigan Maguire, and Prof. Ted Herman at a Pendle Hill Peace Forum lecture at Swarthmore in March 2004

Ted Herman was a pioneer in the peace studies community. He was one of many Quaker scholar/midwives who helped nurture the field of peace studies in the 1960s.    He founded a peace studies program at Colgate University at the height of the Vietnam war. This program now has both a minor and a major in peace and conflict studies.

Ted Herman grew up in West Philadelphia and was a soccer star in his youth.  He did his undergraduate work at Swarthmore (graduating in 1935) and completed a Ph.D. in geography at the University of Washington.  In the interim he taught in China.  He joined the faculty at Colgate University as a professor of geography in 1955 and founded there in 1971 one of the earliest peace studies programs in the United States. He inspired many students to take seriously the study of nonviolence and to pursue careers devoted to peace. Largely because of Ted the Colgate program has a unique emphasis upon geography and trouble spots in the world–like the Middle East, Central America, Africa, or Central Asia–integrating trans-disciplinary academic approaches to war and peace with the study of particular regional conflicts.

Ted Herman was a fantastic mentor.  He mentored me and many other young professors in the nineteen eighties who were attracted to the field of peace studies in response to the growing nuclear threat. I remember well meeting with him at COPRED (Consortium on Peace Research, Education, and Development) and International Peace Research Association (IPRA) conferences. His calm determination and self confidence convinced many of us that we could leave the shelter of our traditional disciplines and walk down the path of peace. Ted Herman understood well how the study of peace could enhance the academy and made it his life’s mission to promote it.

Ted Herman devoted considerable time to bringing together enemies on multiple sides of the Balkan conflict.  In his retirement he often visited the Balkans trying to get Serbs to talk to people from Bosnia-Herzegovina.    He helped establish a peace studies program in Macedonia. I remember him coming to Milwaukee in 1995 and meeting with an important Serbian bishop in the orthodox church and leaders from the Bosnian community.

Professor Ted Herman '35
Professor Ted Herman ’35

Towards the end of his life Ted Herman became convinced that the best way to promote peace studies was through peace research. He threw his considerable talents behind the International Peace Research Association Foundation (IPRAF) a non-profit, tax-exempt organization founded in 1990 to further the purposes of the International Peace Research Association (IPRA) and enhance the processes of peace. With his support IPRAF has carried out peace research projects in the Balkans and the Middle East.  It offers women from developing countries scholarships to study peace at the graduate level and provides small peace research grants to further the field of peace research. (For more information see http://www.iprafoundation.org/) Ted Herman reveled in the rich exchanges that took place at IPRA conferences where scholars from around the world shared their insights into ways to generate peace.

Ted Hermann is held in the hearts of hundreds of peace educators and social activists, like myself, who have been inspired by his quiet determination to promote nonviolence. His memorial service will take place Jan 22, 2011 at 1 p.m. at Lancaster Friends Meeting in Lancaster, PA. I would like encourage those of you who live in the area to consider attending this service to honor an important pioneer in the field of peace and conflict studies.

Ian Harris

Professor emeritus

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Ted Herman (1913-2010)



Ted Herman was a pioneer in the peace studies community. He was one of many

Quaker scholar/midwives who helped nurture the field of peace studies in the

1960s.	He founded a peace studies program at Colgate University at the height

of the Vietnam war. This program now has both a minor and a major in peace and

conflict studies.



Ted Herman grew up in West Philadelphia and was a soccer star in his youth.  He

did his undergraduate work at Swarthmore (graduating in 1935) and completed a

Ph.D. in geography at the University of Washington.  In the interim he taught

in China.  He joined the faculty at Colgate University as a professor of

geography in 1955 and founded there in 1971 one of the earliest peace studies

programs in the United States. He inspired many students to take seriously the

study of nonviolence and to pursue careers devoted to peace. Largely because of

Ted the Colgate program has a unique emphasis upon geography and trouble spots

in the world--like the Middle East, Central America, Africa, or Central

Asia--integrating trans-disciplinary academic approaches to war and peace with

the study of particular regional conflicts.



Ted Herman was a fantastic mentor.  He mentored me and many other young

professors in the nineteen eighties who were attracted to the field of peace

studies in response to the growing nuclear threat. I remember well meeting with

him at COPRED (Consortium on Peace Research, Education, and Development) and

International Peace Research Association (IPRA) conferences. His calm

determination and self confidence convinced many of us that we could leave the

shelter of our traditional disciplines and walk down the path of peace. Ted

Herman understood well how the study of peace could enhance the academy and

made it his life?s mission to promote it.



Ted Herman devoted considerable time to bringing together enemies on multiple

sides of the Balkan conflict.  In his retirement he often visited the Balkans

trying to get Serbs to talk to people from Bosnia-Herzegovina.	He helped

establish a peace studies program in Macedonia. I remember him coming to

Milwaukee in 1995 and meeting with an important Serbian bishop in the orthodox

church and leaders from the Bosnian community.



Towards the end of his life Ted Herman became convinced that the best way to

promote peace studies was through peace research. He threw his considerable

talents behind the International Peace Research Association Foundation (IPRAF)

a non-profit, tax-exempt organization founded in 1990 to further the purposes

of the International Peace Research Association (IPRA) and enhance the

processes of peace. With his support IPRAF has carried out peace research

projects in the Balkans and the Middle East.  It offers women from developing

countries scholarships to study peace at the graduate level and provides small

peace research grants to further the field of peace research. (For more

information see http://www.iprafoundation.org/) Ted Herman reveled in the rich

exchanges that took place at IPRA conferences where scholars from around the

world shared their insights into ways to generate peace.



Ted Hermann is held in the hearts of hundreds of peace educators and social

activists, like myself, who have been inspired by his quiet determination to

promote nonviolence. His memorial service will take place Jan 22, 2011 at 1

p.m. at Lancaster Friends Meeting in Lancaster, PA. I would like encourage

those of you who live in the area to consider attending this service to honor

an important pioneer in the field of peace and conflict studies.



Ian Harris