Tag Archives: music

Ben Taub, foreign correspondent to speak on Syria and Isis

The Daily Gazette presents Ben Taub, a highly successful foreign correspondent with numerous articles published in The New Yorker.

A little over 2 years ago, Ben Taub was a philosophy student at Princeton, and a recent contestant on “The Voice.” He has since reported extensively about ISIS recruiting and ordinary lives in war-torn Syria.

On October 17, he will speak at Swarthmore about how he got where he is, his work, and his experiences in war reporting.

Monday, Oct 17, 2016
7:30 p.m.
Lang Performing Arts Center Room 301
Swarthmore College (directions)
Facebook event page

Ben Taub flyer

 

Choose Peace Concert

Celebrate the International Day of Peace

Choose Peace Concert

September 21, 2016, Wednesday, 7:30-9:00 pm
Swarthmore Friends Meetinghouse
Swarthmore College (directions)

What is visionary peace and what are the choices we can make to live our lives into such a possibility? We are invited to explore linking the cultivation of personal peace to identifying innovative steps toward global peace through song and writings with Rev. Rhetta Morgan, singer, songwriter, interfaith minister, and activist.

Rev. Rhetta Morgan

There will be a time for some audience members to read a quotation about peace that has deepened the meaning of peace for you, that has changed your life, or that has opened or broadened your thinking about or experience of peace. Or you may like to share a poem about peace or a brief paragraph about peace that you have written.  To help with the planning, please send your name and what you’d like to read to Ellen Ross at eross1, by September 16th so that we can arrange the reading order.  Many thanks!

Rev. Rhetta Morgan is Founder of the While We Wait Project sponsored by a Leeway Art for Change grant. The Project provides spiritual and emotional support to loved ones of incarcerated individuals. She has facilitated conversations on race and healing for the Interfaith Peace Walk and other organizations. She recently performed for the Leeway + Bread and Roses Town Hall on Incarceration and Gender, using her voice to create inclusive sacred space. Rev. Rhetta performs and works with Girls Rock Philadelphia, an organization that supports and empowers girls and young women. She has worked with Earth Quaker Action Team (EQAT) and Philly Thrive as both musical leader and spiritual anchor. Rev. Rhetta mentors and counsels activist leaders in our area, encouraging self-care and what she calls a spiritual tool box to aid against despair, overwhelm and depression. A leader in the Philadelphia area, Rev. Rhetta uses music she writes and sings to inspire and heal.

Sponsored by Peace & Conflict Studies

For other International Peace Day Events in the Philadelphia area, see Peace Day Philly.

peace_day_philly.png

 

Lost Yiddish Songs of the Holocaust

From our friends in History and Music:

LOST YIDDISH SONGS OF THE HOLOCAUST

Tuesday, November  10
1:00 to 2:15
Lang Concert Hall
Lang Music Building

“Avant-bard” singer/songwriter/performer Psoy Korolenko and Professor Anna Shternshis of the University of Toronto bring to life lost Yiddish songs of the Holocaust in this combined concert and lecture.  Written and transcribed by surviving Ukrainian Jewish writers of the Kiev Cabinet for Jewish Culture after World War II as a testament to their struggle for survival, these rare Yiddish artifacts were confiscated and hidden by the Soviet government in 1949.  They have only recently come to light.  Come learn about the incredible stories behind these treasures, savor the music, and revel in the creativity of Yiddish-speaking Holocaust survivors.

Korolenko_Yiddish

Sponsored by the Departments of History, Music and the President’s Office

Shaanan Streett on Israeli Culture and Music

A discussion of Israeli culture and music with Shaanan Streett

Friday, October 30 at 4:00 p.m.
Kohlberg Hall 228
Swarthmore College (Directions)

Shaanan Streett is one of the most influential and respected cultural voices in Israel today. He is a singer and songwriter for Israeli band Hadag Nahash (“The Sticker Song”). Streett has released 7 albums with the band, as well as 2 albums of his own. He is a screenplay writer (“The Wonders”), a former columnist (Time out Israel), a peace and social activist (who founded The One Shekel Festival), and a lifelong Jerusalemite in a land where nearly the entire cultural scene has migrated to Tel Aviv.

As part of his talk, Shaanan will share with audiences what he sees as the strengths and flaws of Israel today. Through subtitled video clips he will go on to analyze and share the meanings of the lyrics and where he draws from in his writing. Following each clip, questions will be taken from the audience.

While Israel’s art and culture scene has largely moved to Tel Aviv, Shaanan remains one of the most recognizable faces in Jerusalem. Far from leaving, he owns a bar in the Shuk, has written about it for National Geographic and other publications, his children attend a joint Jewish-Arab school and, time and again, has chosen to stay in spite of the difficulties it brings. In the microcosm of Jerusalem, Shaanan will show and discuss where the lines are drawn and how culture crosses those lines. Shaanan will discuss his life as a member of Israel’s leftist political scene.

This event is organized by Swarthmore Students for Israel  and co-sponsored by the History, Political Science, and Peace and Conflict Studies Departments.

 

 

Omar Offendum: hip-hop, poetry, and peace

Omar Offendum will be coming to Swarthmore on Thursday, November 20th to give a hybrid performance/lecture.

Omar Offendum

In addition to performing some of his songs, he will speak about connections between the artistic community and the Arab uprisings, with a special focus on hip hop.  Omar will also discuss his efforts to use art and music to raise humanitarian relief funds for Syrian refugees. Opening performance by OASiS.

Thursday November 20, 2014
4:30-6:30 p.m.
Science Center 101
Swarthmore College (directions)

Omar is a Syrian American hip-hop artist, designer, poet and peace activist. He was born in Saudi Arabia, raised in Washington, DC, and now lives in Los Angeles, California. He tours the world performing at international music festivals, lecturing at major academic institutions, and fundraising for humanitarian relief organizations. Most recently, Offendum has been involved in creating several critically acclaimed songs about the popular democratic uprisings throughout the Middle East & North Africa. He is also working on several new collaborative projects while touring to promote his solo work.

This event is sponsored by the Arabic Section (MLL), the Intercultural Center, the William Cooper Foundation, the Islamic Studies Program, the Peace and Conflict Studies Program, the Department of Music and Dance, and the Muslim Students Association.

Premiere of Peace Talks for Chorus and Orchestra by James Matheson ’92

Founders Day Concert with the Swarthmore College Chorus and the Swarthmore College Orchestra

December 5, 2014; 8:00 p.m.
Lang Music Building
Swarthmore College (directions)
(Universal moment of silence at 8:00 PM EDT)

Featuring the premiere of Peace Talks for Chorus and Orchestra by James Matheson ’92, commissioned for the Swarthmore Sesquicentennial

James_Matheson_Peace_Talks

The program will also include works for orchestra by Sibelius and Fauré, and choral works from a variety of American composers and traditions.

This event is one of several planned during the 2014 calendar year to celebrate Swarthmore’s Sesquicentennial

Welcome back and new PCS courses for Fall 2014

Opposition to Vietnam War
Welcome back to all staff, students, and faculty! We are off and running, having completed the first week of classes, and we look forward to an exciting semester.

As students will know, the first two weeks of class constitute the drop-add period during which you can change your schedule. That means there is still time for us to announce two new courses to be added to the list of courses that may be counted toward a peace and conflict studies minor. Spots remain open in the following two courses. Check them out!

First-Year Seminar: Revolution and Revolt
English ENGL 009J
Professor Lara Langer Cohen

This course investigates the literature of rebellion from the late eighteenth century’s “Age of Revolution” to the Occupy movement. By taking such a long historical view, we will explore how the revolutionary past of the Atlantic world has helped—and might still help—renegades, outcasts, and dissidents imagine its revolutionary futures. We will read the work of not only famous revolutionary leaders but also infamous and obscure ones, including radical abolitionists, communists, anarchists, feminists, student activists, and more. Throughout the class, we will ask: How do writers define revolution? How do they measure its successes and failures? How do they interpret the memory of previous uprisings and envision possibilities beyond them?

Music and War
Music MUSI 105
Professors Micaela Baranello and Barbara Milewski

For centuries, and across different cultures, music has both served war and illustrated its victories and terror. Music has also provided powerful commentary on war, articulating human pain and protest in equal measure. In this seminar we consider these functions in key works of art and popular music of the 20th century—a century of two world wars—with excursions into previous periods and our own contemporary experience with the war in Iraq. We will discuss music of war; about war; against war; and in the shadow of war.