All posts by bsaldie1

Can Big Bird Fight Terrorism?

A book talk with Naomi Moland, Professorial Lecturer at the School of International Services at American University.

Wednesday, December 4th
4:30p.m.-6:30p.m.
McCabe Library Atrium

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For fifty years, Sesame Street has taught generations of Americans their letters and numbers, and also how to better understand and get along with people of different races, faiths, ethnicities, and temperaments. But the show has a global reach as well, with more than thirty co-productions of Sesame Street that are viewed in over 150 countries. In recent years, the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) has provided funding to the New York-based Sesame Workshop to create international versions of Sesame Street.

At this talk, Dr. Naomi Moland will discuss her new book, Can Big Bird Fight Terrorism? which looks at the Nigerian version, Sesame Square, which began airing in 2011. The show  seeks to promote peaceful coexistence in Nigeria, where segregation, state fragility, and escalating conflict raise the stakes of peacebuilding efforts. This book offers rare insights into the complexities, challenges, and dilemmas inherent in soft power attempts to teach the ideals of diversity and tolerance in countries suffering from internal conflict

The Swarthmore Campus & Community Store will provide books for purchase and author signing.

Sponsored by Peace and Conflict Studies with co-sponsorship from Film and Media Studies and Education Studies

FROM CIVIL RIGHTS TO CIVIL LIBERTIES: The impact of black culture and identity on 21st century diplomacy

A presentation by Justin Davis, Deputy Director, Orientation Division, Foreign Service Institute, U.S. Department of State

Friday, December 6th
4:30-6 pm
Sproul 201, Intercultural Center
Swarthmore College

This event is open to the public. You can find directions and a    campus map on the College’s website.

Justin Davis-3

Organized by Peace and Conflict Studies and Co-Sponsored by Black Studies, Political Science, Sociology and Anthropology, the Black Cultural Center, The Intercultural Center, the Office of Inclusive Excellence, and The Lang Center for Civic and Social Responsibility

Feminist dilemmas: How to talk about gender-based violence in relation to the Middle East

A presentation by Nadje Al-Ali, Robert Family Professor of International Studies, Brown University

Friday, November 8th
4:30-6 pm
Scheuer Room, Kohlberg Hall
Swarthmore College

This event is open to the public. You can find directions and a    campus map on the College’s website.

Nadje Al-Ali-2

ORGANIZED BY PEACE AND CONFLICT STUDIES AND CO-SPONSORED BY ARABIC, GENDER AND SEXUALITY STUDIES, ISLAMIC STUDIES, POLITICAL SCIENCE, SOCIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY, THE INTERCULTURAL CENTER, THE OFFICE OF EXCELLENCE, AND THE LANG CENTER FOR CIVIC AND SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY

“Half-Mile, Upwind, on Foot” film screening and panel

Please join us for a film screening of Half-Mile, Upwind, on Foot, with the filmmaker and anti-pipeline activists featured in the film.

This film documents the efforts of two communities challenging fossil fuel pipeline projects in Pennsylvania, including the Mariner East 2 pipeline that cuts through Delaware County, not far from Swarthmore College.

Wednesday, 13 November 2019
7:00 – 8:30 P.M.
Scheuer Room in Kohlberg Hall
Swarthmore College

This event is open to the public. You can find directions and a campus map on the College’s website. Download a flyer and bring a friend.

Brian McDermott, the filmmaker, writes:

Half-Mile, Upwind, On Foot tells the story of communities who are working to challenge two different pipeline projects in Pennsylvania that are considered by many to be disruptive, dangerous, and unnecessary. A protest sign rests on the ground next to the bucket of a backhoe.Through use of eminent domain, billion-dollar pipeline projects are being developed close to homes, schools and community centers—all for the delivery of natural gas and “highly volatile liquids” overseas. The film shares stories of people who are rising up to assert their basic right to a clean, sustainable environment and a safe community as they are confronted by extraction companies and an unfriendly system that often favors corporate power over the rights of people.

In the film, we meet Ellen Gerhart, a retired special education teacher and grandmother who was jailed twice for protesting the taking of three acres of her land (through eminent domain) for use by a pipeline company. Ellen catalogues the degradation of nature that has been taking place on her property, and she gives an overview of some of the ways companies take advantage of their use of eminent domain. We then follow Ginny Marcille-Kerslake, a geologist who testified in court against a pipeline company and successfully stopped construction on her land by documenting how the pipeline construction was damaging the environment.

We also hear from a group of Catholic Sisters known as the Adorers of the Blood of Christ who built a chapel in a pipeline’s path on their land as an expression of religious freedom and their belief in caring for the earth. Sister Bernice Klostermann provides us with a history of the Adorers who settled in Pennsylvania and she teaches us why it is important to preserve the land.

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We are then introduced to Malinda Harnish Clatterbuck (a Mennonite pastor) and Mark Clatterbuck (a Professor of Religion at Montclair State University), the Co-Founders of Lancaster Against Pipelines who have been working tirelessly for the past four years to protect communities and to inspire others to take action. They reveal what they’ve learned about eminent domain law and regulations regarding pipeline construction, and they provide insight into how extraction companies are able to receive permits for projects even when those projects may be damaging to the environment or disputed by a large number of citizens. Mark and Malinda  also demonstrate how communities can move forward in peaceful ways to protect what they love.

Ultimately, we hear Senator Andrew Dinniman reinforce what many citizens had suspected all along: eminent domain is being compromised in Pennsylvania, and those who oppose the demand for public safety and a clean and sustainable environment, are actually opposing the Constitution of Pennsylvania.

Co-sponsors: Peace and Conflict Studies, Environmental Studies, the Office of Sustainability, and the Lang Center for Civic and Social Responsiblity. 

Download a flyer:

Half Mile poster rough draft 4-9

 

 

 

 

“The 1.5 Insurgent Generation: Stories of El Salvador Postwar”

Please join us for a talk by Irina Carlota (Lotti) Silber, Associate Professor of Anthropology, City University of New York:

“The 1.5 Insurgent Generation: Stories of El Salvador Postwar”

Tuesday, October 22nd 2019

Sproul 201, Intercultural Center

4:30-6:00p.m.

Organized by Peace and Conflict Studies and Co-Sponsored by History, Latin American and Latino Studies, Political Science, Sociology and Anthropology, Spanish, the Intercultural Center, the Office of Inclusive Excellence, and the Lang Center for Civic and Social Responsibility

Please see the poster below for further information.

Irina Silber Talk 2-3

Lou Klarevas, author of “Rampage Nation: Securing America from Mass Shootings”

Please come join us to  a book event at 1 p.m. on Thursday, October 24 with Lou Klarevas, author of Rampage Nation: Securing America from Mass Shootings, a deeply researched study in which he argues that sensible gun control measures can help prevent mass shootings.  Dr. Klarevas will speak in the Inn at Swarthmore’s Gathering Room A.  Afterwards, he will move to the Swarthmore Campus & Community Store to sign copies of his books

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Rampage Nation review excerpt:
In the past decade, no individual act of violence has killed more people in the United States than the mass shooting. This well-researched, forcefully argued book answers some of the most pressing questions facing our society: Why do people go on killing sprees? Are gun-free zones magnets for deadly rampages? What can we do to curb the carnage of this disturbing form of firearm violence?Contrary to conventional wisdom, the author shows that gun possession often prods aggrieved, mentally unstable individuals to go on shooting sprees; these attacks largely occur in places where guns are not prohibited by law; and sensible gun-control measures like the federal Assault Weapons Ban-which helped drastically reduce rampage violence when it was in effect-are instrumental to keeping Americans safe from mass shootings in the future.To stem gun massacres, the author proposes several original policy prescriptions, ranging from the enactment of sensible firearm safety reforms to an overhaul of how the justice system investigates potential active-shooter threats and prosecutes violent crimes. Calling attention to the growing problem of mass shootings,Rampage Nationdemonstrates that this unique form of gun violence is more than just a criminal justice offense or public health scourge. It is a threat to American security.
Louis Klarevas, PhD, teaches in the Department of Global Affairs at the University of Massachusetts–Boston. He also serves as a consultant to the federal government on national security matters. A frequent commentator on homeland security and foreign policy, he has appeared on numerous news programs, including on CNN, ABC, NPR, and the BBC. In the past, he has taught at American University, George Washington University, City University of New York, and New York University. In addition, he has served as the Defense Analysis Research Fellow at the London School of Economics and a Senior Fulbright Scholar in Security Studies.

 

We hope to see you all there!

“Declassification Diplomacy in Latin America: The Use of Secret Archives as Diplomatic Tools to Advance US Foreign Policy in the Region,” a talk with Peter Kornbluh, Senior Analyst at the National Security Archive.

Please join us for a talk this week:

“Declassification Diplomacy in Latin America: The Use of Secret Archives as Diplomatic Tools to Advance US Foreign Policy in the Region,” a talk with Peter Kornbluh, Senior Analyst at the National Security Archive.

Thursday, October 3, 2019

4:15 PM at McCabe Library Atrium

Peace and Conflict Studies is co-sponsoring the event along with Latin American and Latino Studies, Political Science, Spanish, and History. Please see the poster below for further information.

Peter Kornbluh

We hope to see you all there!

You’re Invited to an Artistic Journey of Israel/Palestine…

ARTolerance @ Swarthmore Presents:

An Artistic Journey of Israel/Palestine
in celebration of International Day of Peace
Sunday, September 22 at 7:30PM

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ARTolerance will celebrate the International Day of Peace with an evening of music, spoken word, visuals, and more from Israeli & Palestinian cultures.  We hope to introduce aspirations through cultural expressions and provide bridges towards impactful dialogues.

Featuring…

Poet, Nathalie Handal
Singer/Songwriter, Tammy Scheffer
Singer/Songwriter, Fouad Dakwar
Cellist & ARTolerance Founder, Udi Bar-David
Percussionist & Oud player, Zafer Tawil
Pianist, Shira Samuels-Shragg

In collaboration with Swarthmore College’s Department of Music and Dance, Peace and Conflict Studies Program, and The Office of the President of Swarthmore College.

Here is a link for more information:
https://artolerance.org/events/

Israel/Palestine Film Series- Fall 2019

Israel/Palestine Film Series
Fall 2019
Please join us next week for the annual Israel/Palestine Film Series at Swarthmore. There will be screenings for the first six Wednesdays of the semester, and all are free and open to the public (including pizza and refreshments).

All screenings at 4:15PM in the Lang Performing Arts Center Cinema.
Organized by Peace and Conflict Studies and Sponsored by the Provost’s Office and the Lang Center for Civic and Social Responsibility

2019 film series poster

 

September 4
The Wanted 18  

September 11
The Settlers

September 18
Rock in the Red Zone

September 25
The War Around Us

October 2
Out in the Dark

October 9
The Other Son

“Mother, Daughter, Sister: Amae, Thamee, Ama”; a documentary film on the weaponization of rape in the Myanmar Conflict

The Southeast Asian Student Association will be hosting the film screening of ” Mother, Daughter, Sister: Ama, Thamee, Ama.” This is a documentary on the weaponization of rape in the Myanmar Conflict. The film screening will also include a discussion with director Jeanne Hallacy.  The event is co sponsored by Peace and Conflict Studies as well as Asian Studies. It will take place on Friday, May 3rd.  Please come join us!

Here is a link to the facebook post to learn more information about the event:

https://www.facebook.com/events/385514928965982/

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