Category Archives: Uncategorized

Join the Organizing Skills Institute

OSI_2015-2016

All events are free and will be hosted at the Scheuer Room in Kohlberg Hall. For more information please contact osi@trainingforchange.org


Organizing 101

How to Build Your Group

December 7th, 5-9PM starting with dinner. Organizing on campus means busy schedules and lots of issues to choose from. Come gain skills on how to build interest and commitment in order to form a group actively fighting injustice. Philadelphia organizers Jay Masika (youth organizer, facilitator and organizer), Blanca Pacheco (with the New Sanctuary Movement) and Celia Kutz (TFC Trainer and organizer) will train you on how to build a group’s identity, clarify roles and determine priorities.


Organizing 102

Moving Your Issue Forward:

January 30, 2016, 1-6PM with lunch. Groups working on immigration, the school to prison pipeline or other large issues may struggle picking one part to work on. Come learn how to pick an issue on campus, learn about campaign organizing, create reachable goals and explore what kind of tactics will be most effective to reach those goals. RSVP for this event at osi@trainingforchange.org.


For over 20 years, Training for Change has provided activist training for groups standing up for social, economic, and environmental justice through strategic nonviolence. We’ve led hundreds of workshops and trained thousands of people – from striking steelworkers to interfaith coalitions for immigrant rights – in the skills they need to effectively create change. For more information visit www.trainingforchange.org

All of Us or None: Responses & Resistance to Militarism

All of Us or None: Responses & Resistance to Militarism

Across the globe, militarism directly impacts all of our lives. The American Friends Service Committee’s new traveling exhibition, All of Us or None, examines the effects of militarism at both the foreign and domestic policy levels. It also highlights alternatives and positive nonviolent solutions.

Exhibition:  October 7–November 17, 2015
McCabe Libary Atrium, Swarthmore College

Panel Discussion and Opening Reception
October 8, 4:30 p.m.
McCabe Libary Atrium, Swarthmore College (directions)

Panelists: Sa’ed Atshan (Moderator), Nanci Buiza, Sharon Friedler, Keith Reeves, and Lee Smithey

Download a flyer and a postcard.

AFSC Exhibit Fall 2015

Sponsored by Peace & Conflict Studies and Swarthmore College Libraries.

Tweet your reactions to #HumanizeNotMilitarize.


 

Deadline for Davis Projects for Peace applications extended!

The deadline for applications for the Davis Project for Peace  competition has been extended!

Proposals now due: February 9, 2015, Noon

 Open to students from any class year as well as individuals or groups of students, the Davis Project for Peace grant seeks to fund student initiative, innovation, and entrepreneurship that focuses on conflict prevention, resolution, peacebuilding, or reconciliation in the U.S. and around the world.

Questions? Contact Jennifer Magee (jmagee1).

 DavisProjectsPeace.jpg

1969: The Revolutionary Spring of Black Students by Dr. Ibram X. Kendi

1969: The Revolutionary Spring of Black Students by Dr. Ibram X. Kendi

Dr. Ibram X. Kendi is Professor of Africana Studies at University at
Albany, SUNY

February 5, 2015
4:30-6:00 p.m. 
Scheuer Room, Kohlberg Hall
Swarthmore College (directions to campus)

Kendi
Dr. Ibram X. Kendi is Professor of Africana Studies at University at Albany, SUNY.

From 1965 to 1972, Black students and their allies waged the most transformative antiracist social movement in the history of U.S. education. They organized, demanded, and protested for a relevant learning experience at more than five hundred colleges and universities in every state except Alaska. They pressed for a range of campus reforms, including an end to campus paternalism and racism, and the addition of more Black students, faculty, Black Cultural Centers, and Africana Studies courses and programs. The spring of 1969 was undoubtedly the climax semester of this social movement. From Swarthmore to Cornell, from Duke to Wisconsin, from UCLA to UC Berkeley, Black students and their allies revolutionized the course of higher education for decades to come.

Reception to follow.

This is a part of the Black History Month series of events for 2015. Please see The Black Cultural Center’s website for more information on this and other events.

Contact: history@swarthmore.edu

The big picture on nonviolent resistance and global peace

A couple of interviews that address the big pictures of nonviolent action, militarism, and peace praxis have appeared online.  See them here!

Erica Chenoweth and Maria Stephan, the authors of the award-winning book, Why Nonviolent Civil Resistance Works were interviewed on NPR on August 21, 2014

Peace researcher Jan Oberg recently conducted a half-hour interview on RT.

Note from Lee Smithey: There is lots of useful thought here, though his labeling the Ukrainian resistance in Kiev a Western coup is unlikely and unsubstantiated in the interview.

 

POSTPONED Roth ’84 Lecture on Human Rights and International Law

[This event has been postponed. Stay tuned to this blog for updates.]

COMING TO TERMS WITH RUTHLESSNESS: Human Rights Violations, Moral Outrage, and the Role of International Law

Prof. Brad Roth '84Brad Roth ‘84

Professor of Law, Wayne State University

Monday, October 29, 2012

4:30 PM

Trotter 301

Professor Brad Roth, Swarthmore Class of 1984, teaches political theory and international law at Wayne State University. His recent book, Sovereign Equality and Moral Disagreement (Oxford University Press, 2011), applies principles of political morality to the relationship between international and domestic legal authority.

Sponsored by Departments of Political Science, Peace and Conflict Studies, and History

Prof. Denise Crossan lecture on social entrepreneurship

Dr. Denise CrossanThe Creative Destruction of Capitalism and the Rise of Social Entrepreneurship

A lecture by

Dr. Denise Crossan

Assistant Professor in Social Entrepreneurship

School of Business

Trinity College Dublin

Regional Director of the Swarthmore College Northern Ireland Semester Programme

Monday, November 5, 2012

4:15 p.m.

Science Center 101

Maps and directions to Swarthmore College

An influential 2011 Harvard Business Review article hailed the re-construction of capitalism and the development of a “shared value” approach to business practice. In this talk, drawing on public policy initiatives around the world, Dr. Denise Crossan will explore the complexity of the concept of social entrepreneurship and review how the private sector and international governments are supporting and growing new organisational forms that strive to deliver an equally weighted social and economic return value for their stakeholders.

Dr. Denise Crossan was appointed to Trinity College Dublin’s School of Business in January 2009 as Assistant Professor in Social Entrepreneurship; the first post of it’s kind in Ireland.  She currently teaches at undergraduate and postgraduate levels, and her research interests include mapping social entrepreneurship in an international context; the measurement of social value and ethical practice in social entrepreneurship; international public sector policies to grow social entrepreneurship and understanding corporate social responsibility and blurring sector boundaries.

In 2012 she received the Emerald Literati Network Awards for Excellence, Highly Commended Award Winner, for her paper entitled “The Hologram Effect in Entrepreneurial Social Commercial Enterprises: Triggers and Tipping Points” published in the Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development (Vol. 18, No. 4, 2011).  Dr. Crossan’s in-field experience includes working as Community Business Advisor under the European Union’s Special Programme for Peace and Reconciliation in Northern Ireland from 1996 to 2002, and Dr Crossan acts as the Regional Director of the Swarthmore College Northern Ireland Semester Programme.

Sponsored by Swarthmore’s Study Abroad Office, Lang Center for Civic and Social Responsibility, Peace and Conflict Studies, and Sociology and Anthropology