Category Archives: Uncategorized

Upcoming Lecture: Adia Benton

Adia

Thursday March 24
4:30 PM, Kohlberg Hall 228

Join us for a lecture by Adia Benton Visiting Assistant Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard University and Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Northwestern University. The talk is entitled “Public Health in Post-Conflict African States”

In this talk, Prof. Benton asks the following questions: How do different African states respond to the public health challenges posed by HIV/AIDS, Ebola, and global emergency surgery? How is this complicated in post-conflict contexts? What role do international donors play in these interventions?

Sponsored by Peace and Conflict Studies, Black Studies, Biology, Sociology and Anthropology, Lang Center for Civic and Social Responsibility

Film Screening: Oriented

ORIENTED Film Screening
Tuesday, March 15, 2016
4:30 p.m.
LPAC Cinema

The documentary, “Oriented” directed and produced by Jake Witzenfeld, follows the lives of three gay Palestinian friends confronting their national and sexual identity in Tel Aviv, Israel.

The documentary follows the lives of Khader Abu Seif and his friends, Fadi and Naim. All three are gay Palestinian citizens of Israel who live and work in Tel Aviv. They are politically active and assertive about their right to define their own complex identity — and they’re not at all interested in conforming to the expectations of others.

Sponsored by Peace & Conflict Studies, Sociology and Anthropology, and the Lang Center for Civic and Social Responsibility.

Upcoming Lecture by Binalakshmi Nepram Manipur

Armed Conflict, Small Arms Proliferation and Women’s Non-Violent Peace Movement in Manipur

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Lecture by Binalakshmi Nepram Manipur Women Gun Survivor’s Network, Control Arms Foundation of India & Northeast India, and Women’s Initiative for Peace

Wednesday, March 2, 2016 4:30 p.m.
Science Center 101

Northeast India, home to 45 million people belonging to 272 ethnic groups, has been facing the onslaught of multiple armed conflicts for the last 60 years. This talk will unravel the Northeast Region of India, the complexities of the on-going conflicts, from the struggle over natural resources, ethnic strife, illegal migration, displacement and social exclusion, and discuss the unique and courageous way in which the Meira Paibis or the non-violent “Torch Bearer’s” Movement, led by women, has shown the path for peace and reconciliation. Binalakshmi (Bina) Nepram, born in the state of Manipur located in India’s Northeast region, is a writer and civil rights activist whose work focuses on women-led disarmament movements. She is the author of four books, a recipient of the Dalai Lama Foundation’s WISCOMP Scholar of Peace Award, 2008; the Sean MacBride Peace Prize, 2010; and the CNN IBN Real Heroes Award in 2011. In 2013, the London-based organization Action on Armed Violence named Nepram among the “100 most influential people in world working on armed violence reduction.”

A special luncheon with Bina Nepram has been organized on Thursday March 3, 2016 at 12:30 p.m. at the Lang Center for Civic and Social Responsibility. Due to limited seating, please contact Anna Everetts at aeveret1 if you would like to attend the luncheon.

Sponsored by: Asian Studies, Religion, Peace and Conflict Studies, Gender and Sexuality Studies, Sociology and Anthropology, Lang Center for Civic and Social Responsibility, the President’s Office, and DESHI.

Join the Organizing Skills Institute

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All events are free and will be hosted at the Scheuer Room in Kohlberg Hall. For more information please contact osi@trainingforchange.org


Organizing 101

How to Build Your Group

December 7th, 5-9PM starting with dinner. Organizing on campus means busy schedules and lots of issues to choose from. Come gain skills on how to build interest and commitment in order to form a group actively fighting injustice. Philadelphia organizers Jay Masika (youth organizer, facilitator and organizer), Blanca Pacheco (with the New Sanctuary Movement) and Celia Kutz (TFC Trainer and organizer) will train you on how to build a group’s identity, clarify roles and determine priorities.


Organizing 102

Moving Your Issue Forward:

January 30, 2016, 1-6PM with lunch. Groups working on immigration, the school to prison pipeline or other large issues may struggle picking one part to work on. Come learn how to pick an issue on campus, learn about campaign organizing, create reachable goals and explore what kind of tactics will be most effective to reach those goals. RSVP for this event at osi@trainingforchange.org.


For over 20 years, Training for Change has provided activist training for groups standing up for social, economic, and environmental justice through strategic nonviolence. We’ve led hundreds of workshops and trained thousands of people – from striking steelworkers to interfaith coalitions for immigrant rights – in the skills they need to effectively create change. For more information visit www.trainingforchange.org

All of Us or None: Responses & Resistance to Militarism

All of Us or None: Responses & Resistance to Militarism

Across the globe, militarism directly impacts all of our lives. The American Friends Service Committee’s new traveling exhibition, All of Us or None, examines the effects of militarism at both the foreign and domestic policy levels. It also highlights alternatives and positive nonviolent solutions.

Exhibition:  October 7–November 17, 2015
McCabe Libary Atrium, Swarthmore College

Panel Discussion and Opening Reception
October 8, 4:30 p.m.
McCabe Libary Atrium, Swarthmore College (directions)

Panelists: Sa’ed Atshan (Moderator), Nanci Buiza, Sharon Friedler, Keith Reeves, and Lee Smithey

Download a flyer and a postcard.

AFSC Exhibit Fall 2015

Sponsored by Peace & Conflict Studies and Swarthmore College Libraries.

Tweet your reactions to #HumanizeNotMilitarize.


 

Deadline for Davis Projects for Peace applications extended!

The deadline for applications for the Davis Project for Peace  competition has been extended!

Proposals now due: February 9, 2015, Noon

 Open to students from any class year as well as individuals or groups of students, the Davis Project for Peace grant seeks to fund student initiative, innovation, and entrepreneurship that focuses on conflict prevention, resolution, peacebuilding, or reconciliation in the U.S. and around the world.

Questions? Contact Jennifer Magee (jmagee1).

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1969: The Revolutionary Spring of Black Students by Dr. Ibram X. Kendi

1969: The Revolutionary Spring of Black Students by Dr. Ibram X. Kendi

Dr. Ibram X. Kendi is Professor of Africana Studies at University at
Albany, SUNY

February 5, 2015
4:30-6:00 p.m. 
Scheuer Room, Kohlberg Hall
Swarthmore College (directions to campus)

Kendi
Dr. Ibram X. Kendi is Professor of Africana Studies at University at Albany, SUNY.

From 1965 to 1972, Black students and their allies waged the most transformative antiracist social movement in the history of U.S. education. They organized, demanded, and protested for a relevant learning experience at more than five hundred colleges and universities in every state except Alaska. They pressed for a range of campus reforms, including an end to campus paternalism and racism, and the addition of more Black students, faculty, Black Cultural Centers, and Africana Studies courses and programs. The spring of 1969 was undoubtedly the climax semester of this social movement. From Swarthmore to Cornell, from Duke to Wisconsin, from UCLA to UC Berkeley, Black students and their allies revolutionized the course of higher education for decades to come.

Reception to follow.

This is a part of the Black History Month series of events for 2015. Please see The Black Cultural Center’s website for more information on this and other events.

Contact: history@swarthmore.edu