Tag Archives: nonviolent

Magda and Andre Trocme and Nonviolent Resistance

As part of our recognition of International Peace Day this year:

Andre and Magda TrocmeTwo Pacifists and Their Way of Life: Magda and Andre Trocme and Nonviolent Resistance

Thursday, September 20, 2012

7:30 p.m.

Scheuer Room

Richard Unsworth, author of A Portrait of Pacifists: Le Chambon, the Holocaust and the Lives of Andre and Magda Trocme (Syracuse University Press, 2012) will visit Swarthmore College on September 20, 2012, to talk about this new book.

Unsworth, grandfather of Hannah Gotwals ’13, and a senior fellow at the Kahn Liberal Arts Institute at Smith College, taught religion at both Smith and Dartmouth Colleges. He served as headmaster and president of Northfield Mount Hermon School. His years of involvement with the College Cevenol in France led to a friendship with Andre and Magda Trocme.

A Portrait of Pacifists tells the story of Andre and Magda Trocme, two individuals who made nonviolence a way of life. During World War II, the southern French town of Le Chambon-sur-Lignon and its surrounding villages became a center where Jews and others in flight from Nazi roundups could be hidden or led abroad, and where children with parents in concentration camps could be nurtured and educated.

The courage pf Andre and Magda during World War II has been well documented in books and film, yet the full arc of their lives, the impulse that led them to devote themselves to nonviolence and their extensive work in the decades following the war, has never been compiled into a full-length biography.

Based on their papers in the Swarthmore College Peace Collection, including their unpublished memoirs, interviews, and the author’s research, the book details the couple’s role in the history of pacifism before, during, and after the war. Unsworth traces their mission of building peace by nonviolence throughout Europe to Morocco, Algeria, Japan, Vietnam, and the United States.

Prof. Lakey nears Pittsburgh in walk across Pennsylvania for jobs, justice, and a sustainable environment

For those of you who are not aware, Professor George Lakey is walking 200 miles across Pennsylvania as part of Earth Quaker Action Team to promote sustainable environmental strategy and challenge PNC bank to stop funding mountaintop removal.

Today is Day 13 (nearly two weeks!) and the team expects to arrive in Pittsburgh on Wednesday. George has been blogging each evening along the way, and you can follow his posts via the greenpnc.org website.

Here is his first post and video:

Why I’m walking to Pittsburgh

George Lakey walking across PA

Blog post 4.18.2012

I come from Bangor, a Pennsylvania slate mining town, and identify with the hard work, strong community, and bonding with nature in my heritage.  When I visit Appalachian people I see those same qualities, but I also see the horror of beloved mountains blown up, cancer rates rising, and jobs lost.

I’m sad to imagine what it’s like to have your water and air contaminated by poisons, your town on the skids, the jobs disappearing, and 500 mountains destroyed while more mountains are on the kill list.

I was proud to join others in starting the Earth Quaker Action Team (EQAT) in 2010 with its first campaign targeting PNC Bank: Bank Like Appalachia Matters! PNC is one of the major funders of mountain top removal coal mining.

I also figured that I was doing something for the future of my four great-grandkids, who will join the miners in the catastrophes of climate change if PNC and our country don’t convert to renewable energy.

In the beginning of this year I was led to step up my own commitment.  I felt called to walk to Pittsburgh to challenge directly the corporate CEO of PNC Bank: “Why would you rather fundfewer jobs – while blowing up mountains and spreading cancer – than fund more jobs for clean wind power from those same mountains?”

EQAT supported my calling, and is initiating the

Green Walk for Jobs and Justice

Start: April 30 in Philadelphia, walking 200 miles of the route

Arrive: May 16, at PNC Bank’s headquarters in Pittsburgh

Stops at PNC branches along the way.

Please sponsor me on this walk, and join me for part of the Walk or events along the route if you can.  Financial sponsors are needed to make the Walk possible.

I also want to know from bank officials: “If PNC calls the destruction of Appalachia ‘responsible banking,’ why should any of us do business with you?” I pledge to close my account in PNC on June 1 if it does not promise to stop funding mountain top removal coal mining.

Bayard Rustin, Angelic Trouble Maker?

Bayard Rustin, Angelic Trouble Maker?

Film Screening of Brother Outsider

Followed by discussion with Filmmaker Harold Weaver

Tuesday, March 20, 2012

4:30 p.m.

Science Center 199

Swarthmore College

A master strategist and tireless activist, Bayard Rustin is best remembered as the organizer of the 1963 March on Washington, one of the largest nonviolent protests ever held in the United States. He brought Gandhi’s protest techniques to the American civil rights movement, and helped mold Martin Luther King, Jr. into an international symbol of peace and nonviolence.

Despite these achievements, Rustin was silenced, threatened, arrested, beaten, imprisoned and fired from important leadership positions, largely because he was an openly gay man in a fiercely homophobic era. Five years in the making and the winner of numerous awards, /Brother Outsider /presents a feature-length documentary portrait, focusing on Rustin’s activism for peace, racial equality, economic justice and human rights.

You are invited to a special screening of /Brother Outsider/ which will be followed by a discussion with filmmaker, Harold Weaver.

Dr. Harold Weaver is a Non-Resident Fellow, Du Bois Research Institute, Harvard University. He is also a filmmaker and principal curator of “The China Project,” “The Black Quaker Project” and “The Black Film Project.” Co-editor of the 2011 anthology,/ Black Fire: African American Quakers On Spirituality And Human Rights/, Dr. Weaver taught the first course on African cinema in the United States at Rutgers University in 1972.

This event is free and open to the public.

Organized by Sociology and Anthropology, and Black Studies. Funding provided by many programs and departments.

Listen to Prof. George Lakey on #Occupy

Prof. George LakeyIn case you missed Peace and Conflict Studies Prof. George Lakey’s interview about the Occupy movement on Radio Times today, you can listen at the bottom of this post or on the Radio Times site.

Summary From Radio Times:

Occupy protesters were evicted in Philadelphia and Los Angeles overnight. We’ll get an update on the latest news of the confrontations between protesters and police and we’ll take stock of the Occupy movement, what it’s done and failed to do, how it fits into U.S. political mainstream and social movement history, and how it doesn’t, and the messages the campaign has sought to project vs. the message we in the media have conveyed vs. the messages received by the public at large. Joining us in studio is GEORGE LAKEY, longtime nonviolence activist, founder of Training for Change and research associate at Swarthmore College’s Lang Center for Civic and Social Responsibility. And we’ll also hear from WILL MARSHALL, president and founder of the Progressive Policy Institute, a leading intellectual of the American centrist left and a critic of the Occupy movement. And finally, we’ll hear from MATTATHIAS SCHWARTZ, a writer whose examination of the roots and dynamics of the Occupy movement, “Pre-Occupied,” was published in this week’s The New Yorker.

Peace and Conflict Studies Professor George Lakey on Radio Times on #Occupy November 30, 2011

Recap: Sanger, Awad, and Alwadi

We have had a busy and engaging couple of weeks in Peace and Conflict Studies with events on nonviolent resistance in the Middle East, U.S. foreign policy, mountaintop removal, and women and violence in the Congo.

Here are some pictures and video offered as a brief recap:

(click on the thumbnails below for larger images)

David Sanger

David Sanger

David Sanger addressed the college on October 27, 2011

Mubarak Awad

Mubarak AwadMubarak Awad

Prof. Mubarak Awad addressed the college and local community on November 7, 2011. Stay tuned for the video of Prof. Awad’s talk, which we will post here on the blog.

Nada Alwadi

Nada AlwadiNada AlwadiNada Alwadi

Bahraini journalist, Nada Alwadi, spoke on November 8, 2011. She visited with John Meyer of Pendle Hill after the event and posed for a picture with (L to R) Lee Smithey, Jim MacMillan, and Brahim El Guabli. After her appearance at Swarthmore, she moved on to address the International House of Philadelphia on November 11, 2011.

If you missed Nada Alwadi’s talk, you can hear her online. You can see her webinar with the International Center on Nonviolent Conflict.

Ms. Alwadi was also interviewed by Marty Moss-Coane on WHYY’s Radio Times on the morning following her presentation at Swarthmore. You can listen to the interview here.

Prof. Mubarak Awad, renowned expert on nonviolent resistance to speak on Nov 7

A talk and discussion by Professor Mubarak Awad, School of International Service at American University.

Monday, November 7, 2011

4:30 p.m.

Science Center 101

(maps and directions)

Mubarak Awad is the founder and national president of the Youth Advocate Program, which provides alternative foster care and counseling to “at risk” youth and their families.  He is also the founder of the Palestinian Center for the Study of Nonviolence in Jerusalem.  Dr. Awad was deported by the Israeli Supreme court in 1988 after being jailed for organizing activities involving nonviolent civil disobedience.  Dr. Awad has since formed Nonviolence International, which works with various movements and organizations across the globe.

Sponsors: Students for Peace and Justice in Palestine

Mountaintop removal event

Monday, November 7 · 7:00pm – 8:00pm

Bond Hall at Swarthmore College

(maps and directions)

Ken Hechler
Ken Hechler '35

West Virginian activists Larry Gibson and Swarthmore alumnus Ken Hechler ’35 will speak about the devastating impacts of mountaintop removal coal mining, and the struggles of Appalachian communities to stop the practice.

Mr. Gibson is the founder of Keeper of the Mountains Foundation and an icon in the movement against mountaintop removal. He has bravely resisted intimidation from the coal industry and inspired thousands of people across the country to join the movement.

Mr. Hechler represented West Virginia in the U.S. House of Representatives for nearly 20 years, and also served as the West Virginia Secretary of State. Since 2004, he has also tirelessly campaigned to end mountaintop removal.

Larry Gibson
Larry Gibson

A photography exhibit by Mark Schmerling documenting the impacts of mountaintop removal will accompany the speakers.

This is the first of several events this year with activists who are fighting on the frontlines of fossil fuel extraction. Keep your eyes open for more!

Sponsored by Swarthmore Mountain Justice, Forum for Free Speech, the President’s Office, Political Science, Sociology/Anthropology, Peace and Conflict Studies, Biology, Environmental Studies, and the Alumni Relations office.

 

Bahraini journalist, Nada Alwadi, to speak on nonviolent resistance and the media

Bahrain: The Current Political and Communication Challenges, A View From the Inside

Nada Alwadi

Bahraini Journalist

Tuesday, November 8, 2011

4:30 p.m.

Science Center Room 101

Swarthmore College (maps and directions)

(view or download a flyer)

Nada AlwadiNada Alwadi was a reporter for Alwasat, the most popular newspaper in Bahrain, a monarchy on a small island in the Persian Gulf. Alwadi covered the pro-democracy protests this spring for several media outlets including USA Today Newspaper.

US backed Saudi Arabia sent troops to help shore up the Bahraini monarchy and suppress the popular uprising. Ms. Alwadi was detained in April while reporting on the pro-democracy movement and was forced to sign a statement saying that she would not write on or engage in any political activities, and was fired from her job.

In her presentation, Alwadi will discuss the Bahraini experience of strategic nonviolence and the importance of Bahrain in building a new Middle East. She will address the media blackout in Bahrain, and the current political and communication challenges facing the country as well as the region. She will relate the untold story of a struggle which was forgotten and abandoned by the world and the international media.

Ms. Alwadi is co-founder of the Bahrain Press Association which seeks to defend Bahraini journalists from government repression.

Sponsors: The President’s Office, Peace and Conflict Studies, the Lang Center for Civic and Social Responsibility, History, Sociology and Anthropology, Political Science, Islamic Studies, the Intercultural Center, Gender and Sexuality Studies, and the Arabic Section of Modern Languages and Literatures

 

New media technology brings nonviolent protest to our desktops

Llivestreaming technology allows protest movements to broadcast live news, providing new opportunities for activists to frame their concerns and raise the costs of repression by authorities. The broad availability of such technology raises interesting questions about the conceptual boundaries of journalism and freedom of the press. Here are several lives streams from the October 2011 and Occupy Wall Street movements.

October 2011

Live streaming by Ustream

Occupy Wall Street DC

 

Watch live streaming video from globalrevolution at livestream.com

Occupy Wall Street NYC

Watch live streaming video from globalrevolution at livestream.com

Watch live streaming video from occupywallstnyc at livestream.com

OccupyPhilly

Free live streaming by Ustream