Opportunities for Alumni: Dance Studies Position

Dance Studies Job Posting, Swarthmore College

The Swarthmore College Department of Music and Dance invites applications for a full-time, tenure track position in Dance Studies at the assistant professor level, with a specialization in ballet and/or modern dance, beginning in Fall 2015 . We are looking for an exceptional scholar/practitioner who can demonstrate a visible national and international profile, a strong record of publication and creative work, excellence in undergraduate teaching, and knowledge of curriculum development and design.

The successful candidate will teach five courses per year, including courses on dance history, theory, and technique courses, integrating theory and practice whenever possible. As a small collaborative department, members of the faculty also contribute to supervision of undergraduate theses, student productions, and events with visiting artists. Other responsibilities include administrative work and service to the College. The ideal candidate will hold a Ph.D in Dance or Performance Studies, although exceptional candidates with M.F.As will be considered. Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience. The deadline for applications is December 1, 2014. Review of applications will begin in January and continue until the position is filled. Qualified applicants should submit an online application at https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/4534.

Please include a letter of application, curriculum vitae, three reference letters, one or more samples of scholarship/creative work, and a sample syllabus.

Swarthmore College is a highly selective liberal arts college, located in the suburbs of Philadelphia, whose mission combines academic rigor with social responsibility. Swarthmore has a strong institutional commitment to inclusive excellence through diversity in its educational program and employment practices. The College actively seeks and welcomes applications from candidates with exceptional qualifications, particularly those with demonstrable commitments to a more inclusive society and world.
Application Materials Required: Submit the following items online at this website:

* Cover Letter
* Curriculum Vitae
* Scholarship/Creative Work Sample
* Sample Syllabus
* Three Reference Letters (to be submitted by the reference writers at this site)

Opportunities Beyond Swarthmore: Asst. Professor wanted

Assistant Professor (Dance) Tenure Track – Hobart and William Smith

The Department of Dance invites applications for a tenure-track position in Dance (Africanist/African diaspora) at the rank of Assistant Professor beginning fall 2015; terminal degree MFA or Ph.D. required. We seek an artist/scholar whose work stems from an Afro-centric perspective to join a vibrant Dance department in an interdisciplinary liberal arts environment. We seek a colleague who can offer studio- based courses and dance theory courses in fairly equal proportions; an artist/scholar whose expertise is based in/informed by a form whose movement roots are Africanist, whether traditional or contemporary, i.e.: African, Afro-Brazilian, Afro-Caribbean or other African diaspora forms.

Qualifications:

  • Terminal degree required
  • Terminal degree in discipline other than Dance with professional experience in dance a possibility
  • Teaching experience in the field
  • Evidence of artist/scholar activity
  • Demonstrated interest in teaching in a liberal arts environment

Application Instructions:Application deadline is October 1, 2014, but we will continue to review applications until the position is filled. Expected start date: July 1, 2015. Please send the following documents to Inter-folio’s ByCommittee, which is free to applicants at this link http://apply.interfolio.com/25264

  • Letter of application which addresses your qualifications for this position and summarizes your artistic/scholarly identity
  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Teaching Philosophy statement
  • Teaching Interests statement
  • Names and contact information (telephone and e-mail) for three current referencesCandidates of interest will be asked to submit graduate transcripts, videotapes/dvds of choreographic work, and/or further documentation of artistic/scholarly work through Inter-folio. Please do not submit additional materials unless requested.The preferred method of application is through Interfolio’s ByCommittee (http://apply.interfolio.com/25264). Questions may be directed to Professor Cynthia J Williams, Search Committee Chair, Dance Department, Hobart and William Smith Colleges, 300 Pulteney Street, Geneva, NY 14456. Contact email: Williams@hws.edu; Contact telephone (315) 781-3495.
    EOE

Hobart and William Smith Colleges are committed to attracting and supporting faculty and staff that fully represent the racial, ethnic, and cultural diversity of the nation and actively seek applicants from under-represented groups. The Colleges do not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, marital status, national origin, age, disability, veteran’s status, sexual orientation, gender identity and expression or any other protected status.

Founded as Hobart College for men and William Smith College for women, Hobart and William Smith Colleges today are a highly selective liberal arts institution with a single administration, faculty and curriculum but separate dean’s offices, student governments, athletic programs and traditions. The Colleges are located in a small diverse city in the Finger Lakes region of New York State. With an enrollment of approximately 2,000, the Colleges offer 62 different majors and minors from which students choose two areas of concentration, one of which must be an interdisciplinary program. Creative and extensive programs of international study and public service are also at the core of the Colleges’ mission.

 

 

 

David Hartsough

Waging Peace: David Hartsough book talk

David Hartsough book

David Hartsough
Waging Peace: Global Adventures of a Lifelong Activist

Thursday, December 4, 2014
5:00 PM
Bond Hall at Swarthmore College
500 College Ave, Swarthmore, PA

This event is open to the public.
Maps and directions to campus are available.
A flyer is available for download.

David Hartsough knows how to get in the way. He has used his body to block Navy ships headed for Vietnam and trains loaded with munitions on their way to El Salvador and Nicaragua. He has crossed borders to meet “the enemy” in East Berlin, Castro’s Cuba, and present-day Iran. He has marched with mothers confronting a violent regime in Guatemala and stood with refugees threatened by death squads in the Philippines.

Inspired by the examples of Mahatma Gandhi and Martin Luther King Jr., Hartsough has spent his life experimenting with the power of active nonviolence. His new memoir, Waging Peace, offers a peace activist’s eyewitness account of many of the major historical events of the past sixty years, including the Civil Rights and anti–Vietnam War movements in the United States and the little- known but equally significant nonviolent efforts in the Soviet Union, Kosovo, Palestine, Sri Lanka, and the Philippines.

Hartsough’s story demonstrates the power and effectiveness of organized nonviolent action and shows how this struggle is waged all over the world by ordinary people committed to ending the spiral of violence and war.

Read more about David Hartsough and his work in this 2004 interview in the New Internationalist magazine.

Photo: David Hartsough (seated at right end of counter) with fellow students at a lunchtime sit-in Arlington, Virginia – circa 1960

 

Co-sponsored by Swarthmore Friends Meeting and the Peace and Conflict Studies Program at Swarthmore College.

Daniel Hirschel-Burns 14

Daniel Hirschel-Burns ’14 awarded the 2014 Peace and Justice Studies Association Undergraduate Paper Award

We are thrilled to announce that, for the second year in a row, a Swarthmore peace and conflict studies special major has won the Peace and Justice Studies Association‘s Undergraduate Student Paper Award. Danny Hirschel Burns ’14 will receive this year’s award for his thesis, “Filling the Gap: Nonviolent Strategies for Civilian Self-protection during Mass Atrocities.” (Elowyn Corby won the award last year.)

Daniel Hirschel-Burns 14

The PJSA is the primary professional association for peace and conflict studies educators and researchers in North America, and it is the North American affiliate of the International Peace Research Association.

Danny’s thesis was co-advised by Professors Krista Thomason and Lee Smithey.  The award will be presented at the association’s award ceremony on October 18, 2014 during the annual PJSA meeting at the Joan B. Kroc School of Peace Studies at the University of San Diego. Danny’s award comes with a $500 travel stipend and an invitation to present his thesis at the conference.

Danny is currently serving as an atrocity prevention intern at Humanity United in Washington D.C.

Please join us in congratulating Danny (@DHirschelBurns) on his excellent work!

The Arab Spring, Four Years Later: Hope or Despair?

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The Arab Spring, Four Years Later: Hope or Despair?
Lecture by Dr. Sean Yom, Temple University

Monday, Oct. 6, 4:30 p.m., Kohlberg Scheuer Room

Four years on, the Arab Spring had generated wildly contrasting outcomes. From democratization in Tunisia to authoritarian revival in Egypt to civil war in Syria, the regional wave of popular protest has certainly washed away the foundations of the old order.

Can democratization spread to other countries without incurring the risk of war? This lecture aims to answer this question, giving a bird’s eye view of different processes and events from a political scientist’s perspective.

Sean Yom is Assistant Professor of Political Science (comparative politics). His research broadly focuses on authoritarianism and development, and he is now finishing his first book on state-building and political order in the post-colonial Middle East.

Sponsored by the Islamic Studies Program.

Job opening: Assistant Professor of Peace and Conflict Studies at Swarthmore College

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The Peace and Conflict Studies Program of Swarthmore College invites applications for a full-time three-year position at the assistant professor level, beginning Fall 2015. Swarthmore College is committed to excellence through diversity in its educational program and employment practices and actively seeks and welcomes applications from candidates with exceptional qualifications, particularly those with demonstrable commitment to a more inclusive society and world. Racial minorities and others from underrepresented groups are strongly encouraged to apply.

Candidates should have expertise in peace and conflict studies and either conflict analysis and transformation / conflict resolution and / or social justice studies. The successful candidate for the position will be expected to teach five courses in our interdisciplinary undergraduate program, one of which will include the program’s introductory course, and assist in the coordination of the program. We seek a candidate with strong teaching and research skills and a knowledge and passion for peace studies that will support student advising and contribute to the development of a dynamic program. We also seek a candidate who is committed to fostering an inclusive classroom environment. A Ph.D. in peace and conflict studies or in another discipline accompanied by extensive intellectual and professional engagement in the field of peace and conflict studies is required.

Consideration of applications will begin on October 10, and we expect to begin interviewing candidates in early November. Candidates should send a cover letter, curriculum vitae, writing samples, and three letters of recommendation.
(The cover letter should address teaching philosophy, experience, and research agenda.) Please apply at https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/4550. If unable to submit online, send your materials to: Anna Everetts, Peace and Conflict Studies Program, Swarthmore College, Swarthmore, PA 19081-1397 peacestudies @ swarthmore.edu. Direct inquiries to the program coordinator, Lee Smithey, at lsmithe1 @ swarthmore.edu

 

 

 

Thich Nhat Hanh, Sister Chan Khong, and Alfred Hassler

Screening of “The 5 Powers” film to celebrate the International Day of Peace

The 5 Powers

A film about the transnational peace work of Thich Nhat Hanh, Sister Chan Khong, and Alfred Hassler.

Thursday, September 18, 2014
7:00 – 8:45 p.m.
Swarthmore College
Lang Performing Arts Center Cinema (directions)
OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
Download a flyer and help advertise the event.

Each year, we mark the International Day of Peace at Swarthmore College as part of Peace Day Philly.

This year, we will screen a new documentary film, “The 5 Powers” about the transnational peace work of Thich Nhat Hanh,  Sister Chan Khong, and Alfred Hassler during the Vietnam War.

Sister_Chan_Khong_ccDiscussion  with the producers of the film (Anthony Nicotera, Gregory Kennedy-Salemi, and Stuart Jolley), Laura Hassler ’70, and George Lakey (who worked with Alfred Hassler of the Fellowship of Reconciliation) will follow the screening.

The 5 Powers film is organized around central tenets of Buddhist philosophy and features a captivating mix of comic book style animation (by Dave Gibbons of Watchmen fame), live interviews, archival audio, photos, and documents, some of which were procured from the Peace Collection at Swarthmore.

Read more about the film and view the trailer here:

Sponsored by Peace and Conflict Studies, Film and Media Studies, the Religion Department, Asian Studies, the Swarthmore College Libraries, the Peace Collection, and Alumni Relations

5 Powers cover lo res

 

For parking:  See the campus map at http://www.swarthmore.edu/campusmap/ Enter campus at the NORTH ENTRANCE and follow the drive, Whittier Place, to the first large parking lot on the right. For drop-off, continue to follow Whittier Place, turning right at the corner of the parking lot.  The drive will proceed around the back of several buildings to a circular turn around at the Lang Performing Arts Center.  For more information about accessibility at the Lang Performing Arts Center, visit http://bit.ly/1uKd9uR For those parking in the large lot, walk to the corner of the lot, cross the street, and proceed diagonally across the quad to the Lang Performing Arts Center. The cinema is located just to your left as you enter the main lobby.

Opposition to Vietnam War

Welcome back and new PCS courses for Fall 2014

Opposition to Vietnam War
Welcome back to all staff, students, and faculty! We are off and running, having completed the first week of classes, and we look forward to an exciting semester.

As students will know, the first two weeks of class constitute the drop-add period during which you can change your schedule. That means there is still time for us to announce two new courses to be added to the list of courses that may be counted toward a peace and conflict studies minor. Spots remain open in the following two courses. Check them out!

First-Year Seminar: Revolution and Revolt
English ENGL 009J
Professor Lara Langer Cohen

This course investigates the literature of rebellion from the late eighteenth century’s “Age of Revolution” to the Occupy movement. By taking such a long historical view, we will explore how the revolutionary past of the Atlantic world has helped—and might still help—renegades, outcasts, and dissidents imagine its revolutionary futures. We will read the work of not only famous revolutionary leaders but also infamous and obscure ones, including radical abolitionists, communists, anarchists, feminists, student activists, and more. Throughout the class, we will ask: How do writers define revolution? How do they measure its successes and failures? How do they interpret the memory of previous uprisings and envision possibilities beyond them?

Music and War
Music MUSI 105
Professors Micaela Baranello and Barbara Milewski

For centuries, and across different cultures, music has both served war and illustrated its victories and terror. Music has also provided powerful commentary on war, articulating human pain and protest in equal measure. In this seminar we consider these functions in key works of art and popular music of the 20th century—a century of two world wars—with excursions into previous periods and our own contemporary experience with the war in Iraq. We will discuss music of war; about war; against war; and in the shadow of war.