Tag Archives: Quaker

Quaker Rhetoric and the Birth of American Antislavery, 1657-1761

We would like to share this exciting announcement from our friends in the Department of Religion and the Friends Historical Library. Visit the Quakers and Slavery exhibit online in Triptych.

From Peace to Freedom

Quaker Rhetoric and the Birth of American Antislavery, 1657-1761

Lecture by Brycchan Carey

Wednesday, March 6, 7:00 pm, Friends Meeting House, Swarthmore College

In his book “From Peace to Freedom,” Carey shows how the Quakers turned against slavery in the first half of the eighteenth century and became the first organization to take a stand against the slave trade. Through meticulous examination of the earliest writings of the Friends, including journals and letters, Carey reveals the society’s gradual transition from expressing doubt about slavery to adamant opposition.

Brycchan Carey is Reader in English literature, Kingston University, London.

Sponsored by The Department of Religion and Friends Historical Library

Maps and directions 

Download a flyer.

 

The picture and transcription below are posted with the permission of the Friends Historical Library from the Tri-college online archive of documents and photos, Triptych. John Woolman published the second part of his book, Considerations on keeping Negroes, in 1762. The first part was printed in 1754.

Press and Woolmans book
From the Overseers of the Press Concerning Jn. Woolmans Negro Book

To the Quarterly and Monthly Meetings of Friends belonging to the Yearly Meeting which is held for Pennsylvania and New Jersey.  Our Friend John Woolman having wrote some Considerations on keeping Negroes Part the second, the same hath been inspected by the Friends appointed to oversee the Press, and are now printed containing fifty two Pages, and are to be sold by David Hall at the New Printing Office near the Jersey Market in Philadelphia at [sevenpence] per Piece. A considerable Number of them are lodged with our Friend James Pemberton, and with our Friend William Wilson at his Store in Market Street, opposite to the London Coffee House between Front and Water Streets, and if such Friends who are inclined to purchase would at the Close of a Monthly Meeting when Time permits give in their Names to some one of their Members the Books are ready to be delivered to the Purchasers by our said Friends at [4/9]. per Dozen that being no more than the Cost of publishing & binding them. Signed in Behalf of the Overseers of the Press aforesaid By Jams. Pemberton. Philad. 28. 3 mo 1762.

Quaker Public Policy Institute and Lobby Day

Any Peace and Conflict Studies folks interested in an opportunity to “lobby your member of Congress for a more moral federal budget”?

The Friends Committee on National Legislation’s Quaker Public Policy Institute and Lobby Day is coming up November 15-16, 2012. Find more information at http://fcnl.org/events/annual_meeting/Lobby2012

UPDATE 10/31/12:  Young Adult Friends who are members of a Philadelphia Yearly Meeting could receive some financial assistance to come to QPPI.

Contact:

Rachel Kent

Program Assistant for Nuclear Disarmament

Friends Committee on National Legislation

202-903-2518 / rachel@fcnl.org

Lucretia Mott Symposium – November 4

Lucretia Mott Symposium, Swarthmore College

Friday, November 4, 2011, 2:00 – 5:30

Scheuer Room, Kohlberg Hall, Swarthmore College

Free and Open to the Public  (maps and directions)

Lucretia Mott (1793-1880), Quaker minister, abolitionist and feminist,  a founder of the American Anti-Slavery Society, the Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society and the “guiding spirit” behind the First Woman’s Rights Convention at Seneca Falls in 1848, spent sixty years of her long life working for reform.  This symposium marks the publication of historian Carol Faulkner’s new book, Lucretia Mott’s  Heresy: Abolition and  Woman’s Rights in  Nineteenth Century America.  The symposium also commemorates the contributions of Margaret  Hope Bacon (1921-2011), author of Lucretia Mott: Valiant Friend and numerous books on Quakers and reform.

2:00 – 3:30        Lucretia Mott, Margaret Hope Bacon and the Rediscovery of the Early Woman’s Rights Movement and Radical Reform.

Presenters:  Beverly Wilson Palmer, Nancy Hewitt, Judith Wellman and Christopher Densmore.

4:00 – 5:30         Lucretia Mott: Truth for Authority, Not Authority for Truth

Presenters: Carol Faulkner, Ellen M. Ross and Bruce Dorsey.

Questions? contact cdensmo1@swarthmore.edu