Tag Archives: Friends Historical Library

Friends, Peace, and Sanctuary Launch Event

Our friends in the Swarthmore College Library and the Lang Center for Civic and Social Responsibility invite you to join them on Sunday, Nov. 19th from 1:00-4:00 at the Perelman Building at the Philadelphia Museum of Art to learn more about Swarthmore College’s Friends, Peace, and Sanctuary project.

At the event, you can meet the book artists working on the project, connect with potential collaborators, and celebrate the project’s launch with tea, snacks, and art-making.
Friends, Peace, and Sanctuary flyer

Swarthmore College’s Friends, Peace, and Sanctuary will bring together book artists and Syrian and Iraqi individuals who have resettled to Philadelphia. Driven by questions about displacement and refuge, history and experience, the project explores art’s capacity to build empathy and create a deeper sense of belonging.

Working in partnership with the immigrant and refugee service organization Nationalities Service Center, Swarthmore will invite a group of collaborators to work with renowned book artists and participate in multi-day workshops designed to provide access to new creative tools, and to explore various aspects of visual storytelling, artistic expression, and craft. Swarthmore’s library collections—including the Friends Historical Library and the “Peace Collection,” the largest archive of peace-related material in the U.S.—will be made available to book artists to inform their commissioned works, and to collaborators, with materials translated into Arabic.

Both the workshop collaborators and the book artists will create books that highlight the relationship between historical and contemporary stories of displacement. The project will culminate in a series of programs, exhibitions, and an exhibition catalogue that will focus on how archival, academic, and community knowledges can come together to address contemporary issues.

Friends, Peace, and Sanctuary has been supported by The Pew Center for Arts & Heritage and is a collaboration between Swarthmore Libraries and the Lang Center for Civic and Social Responsibility.

Peace symbol atop Parrish Hall?

By Christopher Densmore, Curator, Friends Historical Library, Swarthmore College.

The weather vane atop Parrish Hall is in the shape of a feather.

People with sharp eyes may have noticed that the feather has been
fashioned into a quill pen. This is easier to see in the old Parrish
Hall weathervane mounted on the wall on the center staircase of Parrish Hall between the first and second floor.

Weathervane in Parrish Hall

This earlier weathervane was replaced by another (maybe the current version) in the 1930s. For an institution of higher learning, a quill pen seems quite appropriate. However, there is a possible additional reference. It may be a reference to William Penn, the founder of Pennsylvania. If this is the case, it is also a peace symbol, referencing William Penn’s treaties with the Indians.

The following is from a 1798 letter to the Six Nations (the
Haudenousnee):

“To our Indians Brethren of the six Nations Brothers; We rejoice that you are now at peace and we pray to the Good Spirit that he may continue to preserve you from the miseries of war, We have always had your welfare at heart, ever since our Grandfather, Onas came into this country; and the present time appears to us to be a favourable one, again, to manifest our unalterable friendship for you We cannot forget the harmony that subsisted between our forefathers and the Indians during the first settlement of this country.”

The Haudenosaunee referred to William Penn as Onas, their word for feather, and by extension, a feather quill pen.

At least this is more likely than the story appearing in the Phoenix in
1941, claiming that the feather was from the golden phoenix, dropped when that bird took flight from Swarthmore following his/her rebirth in fire.

Moore Research Fellowship at Swarthmore College

Interested in conducting research in the Friends Historical Library or the Peace Collection at Swarthmore College?  Apply for the Moore Research Fellowship!

Margaret W. Moore and John M. Moore Research Fellowship
Swarthmore College

SYNOPSIS:  The purpose of the Margaret W. Moore and John M. Moore Research Fellowship is to provide a stipend to promote research during the academic year or summer months using the resources of the Friends Historical Library and/or the Swarthmore College Peace Collection.

Deadline(s):      03/31/2015
Established Date: 04/10/2003
Follow-Up Date:   02/01/2016
Review Date:      02/26/2015

Contact:  Christopher Densmore, Curator

Address:
Friends Historical Library of Swarthmore College
500 College Avenue
Swarthmore, PA 19081-1399
U.S.A.

E-mail:  cdensmo1@swarthmore.edu
Web Site: http://www.swarthmore.edu/library/peace/
Program URL: http://bit.ly/185AMb7
Tel:              610-328-8557
Deadline Ind:     Receipt
Deadline Open:    No

Award Type(s):    Facilities-Access To Fellowship Summer

Citizenship/Country of Applying Institution: Any/No Restrictions

Locations Tenable:    U.S.A. Institution (including U.S. Territories)

Appl Type(s):

  • Faculty Member
  • Researcher/Investigator
  • Graduate Student

Target Group(s):  NONE
Funding Limit:    $0   NOT PROV
Duration: 0
Indirect Costs: Unspecified
Cost Sharing: No
Sponsor Type:  College/University
Geo. Restricted:  NO RESTRICTIONS

OBJECTIVES:  The purpose of the Margaret W. Moore and John M.
Moore Research Fellowship is to provide a stipend to promote research during the academic year or summer months using the resources of the Friends Historical Library and/or the Swarthmore College Peace Collection. Strong preference will be given to projects utilizing resources only available at Swarthmore. Moore fellows will be asked to give a lecture at Swarthmore College subsequent to and based upon their research at a date agreed upon by the Moore Fellowship Committee and the Moore fellow.

ELIGIBILITY
Those eligible to apply include Swarthmore College students and
faculty, as well as faculty, graduate students, and scholars from
outside the Swarthmore College community.

FUNDING
The amount of the stipend will be announced.  (jap)

KEYWORDS:

  • American History
  • Religious History
  • Conflict/Dispute Resolution
  • Social Change
  • Peace/Disarmament/Amnesty

TODAY: Learn about Joshua Evansc an active Quaker abolitionist

quakers_slavery_BM

Joshua Evans Event at Friends Historical Library of Swarthmore College

Wednesday, April 9, 4:30 PM

Ralph Greene of New England Yearly Meeting will present a program on Joshua Evans (1741-1798). Evans was considered “singular” even by the Quakers. He was an early and active abolitionist, traveling as far South Carolina to bear testimony against enslavement, he worked on behalf of the Native Americans in New Jersey, his scruples against any support of slavery led him to wear undyed clothes, because the dyes used at the time were produced by slave labor, and he criticized the worldliness of Quakers of his time, suggesting among other things that the wearing of shoe buckles, where a simple lace would do, was vanity.

The manuscript Joshua Evans Journals at Friends Historical Library are being digitized and transcribed as part of a Digital Humanities Program.

Ralph Greene is very active in New England Yearly Meeting and the Friends Church in South China, Maine.

All are invited to Friends Historical Library, just inside McCabe Library, to hear more about the life and witness of Joshua Evans. Please forward this invitation to anyone who might be interested.