Tag Archives: alumni

Thanks to Mary Walton for her lecture on Alice Paul ’05 and Mabel Vernon ’06

We would like to thank author Mary Walton for her lecture this afternoon on the courageous work of Swarthmore alums Alice Paul ’05 and Mabel Vernon ’06 in their organizing and nonviolent campaigns to secure the vote for women in the United States.

A standing-room only crowd of people from the Swarthmore community and the local community gathered in the Scheuer Room to celebrate the International Day of Peace, the College’s sesquicentennial, and 125 years since the first peace studies course in higher education was taught at Swarthmore. The audience expressed their appreciation for Ms. Walton’s presentation with extended applause.

We would like to thank all of our co-sponsors who made this event a success, including Peace Day Philly for including our event in the city-wide celebration of the International Day of Peace.

walton_event_logos

 

Sponsors: Peace and Conflict Studies, the President’s Office, Swarthmore College Peace Collection, Friends Historical Library, History Department, Gender and Sexuality Studies, Women’s Resource Center, Lang Center for Civic and Social Responsibility, English Literature Department, and Political Science Department.

Ian Kysel ’04 on Human Rights Watch and the American Civil Liberties Union

Ian Kysel ’04 will speak on Human Rights Watch and the American Civil Liberties Union

Tuesday, March 27, 2012; 5:30pm in Science Center room 183 at Swarthmore College

Ian Kysel is the Aryeh Neier Fellow with Human Rights Watch and the American Civil Liberties Union where he focuses on the solitary confinement of youth held in jails and prisons in the United States. He is also a volunteer with the International Migrants Bill of Rights (IMBR) Initiative, of which he was formerly a co-coordinator. While a law student at Georgetown, Ian worked with the Georgetown Center for Applied Legal Studies, the United States Department of State Office of the Legal Adviser, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, Amnesty International USA and Shearman & Sterling, LLP.

Prior to law school, Ian worked with non-citizens seeking asylum in the United States at Bromberg, Kohler Maya & Maschler, PLLC and lived in both Moscow and Algiers. Ian received a B.A. with high honors, Phi Beta Kappa, from Swarthmore College in 2004, where he was a member of Sixteen Feet and helped create a pilot Outdoor Orientation Program with Swarthmore, Haverford and Bryn Mawr Colleges, and received a J.D., magna cum laude, with a Certificate in Refugees & Humanitarian Emergencies from Georgetown University Law Center in 2011, where he was a Global Law Scholar, recipient of the Bettina E. Pruckmayr Memorial Award and an Articles Editor of the Georgetown Journal of International Law.

Sponsor: Career Services

Professor Ted Herman (1913-2010) Swarthmore class of 1935

Ted Herman, an important figure in the development of Peace Studies, recently passed away.  Prof. Herman lived not far from Swarthmore and was well known in the area.  We would like to share this tribute from another major peace studies scholar, Dr. Ian Harris, and express our appreciation and condolences to Prof. Herman’s friends, family, and colleagues.

Ted Herman (1913-2010)

Prof. Lee Smithey, Nobel laureate Mairead Corrigan Maguire, and Prof. Ted Herman at a Pendle Hill Peace Forum lecture at Swarthmore in March 2004

Ted Herman was a pioneer in the peace studies community. He was one of many Quaker scholar/midwives who helped nurture the field of peace studies in the 1960s.    He founded a peace studies program at Colgate University at the height of the Vietnam war. This program now has both a minor and a major in peace and conflict studies.

Ted Herman grew up in West Philadelphia and was a soccer star in his youth.  He did his undergraduate work at Swarthmore (graduating in 1935) and completed a Ph.D. in geography at the University of Washington.  In the interim he taught in China.  He joined the faculty at Colgate University as a professor of geography in 1955 and founded there in 1971 one of the earliest peace studies programs in the United States. He inspired many students to take seriously the study of nonviolence and to pursue careers devoted to peace. Largely because of Ted the Colgate program has a unique emphasis upon geography and trouble spots in the world–like the Middle East, Central America, Africa, or Central Asia–integrating trans-disciplinary academic approaches to war and peace with the study of particular regional conflicts.

Ted Herman was a fantastic mentor.  He mentored me and many other young professors in the nineteen eighties who were attracted to the field of peace studies in response to the growing nuclear threat. I remember well meeting with him at COPRED (Consortium on Peace Research, Education, and Development) and International Peace Research Association (IPRA) conferences. His calm determination and self confidence convinced many of us that we could leave the shelter of our traditional disciplines and walk down the path of peace. Ted Herman understood well how the study of peace could enhance the academy and made it his life’s mission to promote it.

Ted Herman devoted considerable time to bringing together enemies on multiple sides of the Balkan conflict.  In his retirement he often visited the Balkans trying to get Serbs to talk to people from Bosnia-Herzegovina.    He helped establish a peace studies program in Macedonia. I remember him coming to Milwaukee in 1995 and meeting with an important Serbian bishop in the orthodox church and leaders from the Bosnian community.

Professor Ted Herman '35
Professor Ted Herman ’35

Towards the end of his life Ted Herman became convinced that the best way to promote peace studies was through peace research. He threw his considerable talents behind the International Peace Research Association Foundation (IPRAF) a non-profit, tax-exempt organization founded in 1990 to further the purposes of the International Peace Research Association (IPRA) and enhance the processes of peace. With his support IPRAF has carried out peace research projects in the Balkans and the Middle East.  It offers women from developing countries scholarships to study peace at the graduate level and provides small peace research grants to further the field of peace research. (For more information see http://www.iprafoundation.org/) Ted Herman reveled in the rich exchanges that took place at IPRA conferences where scholars from around the world shared their insights into ways to generate peace.

Ted Hermann is held in the hearts of hundreds of peace educators and social activists, like myself, who have been inspired by his quiet determination to promote nonviolence. His memorial service will take place Jan 22, 2011 at 1 p.m. at Lancaster Friends Meeting in Lancaster, PA. I would like encourage those of you who live in the area to consider attending this service to honor an important pioneer in the field of peace and conflict studies.

Ian Harris

Professor emeritus

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Ted Herman (1913-2010)



Ted Herman was a pioneer in the peace studies community. He was one of many

Quaker scholar/midwives who helped nurture the field of peace studies in the

1960s.	He founded a peace studies program at Colgate University at the height

of the Vietnam war. This program now has both a minor and a major in peace and

conflict studies.



Ted Herman grew up in West Philadelphia and was a soccer star in his youth.  He

did his undergraduate work at Swarthmore (graduating in 1935) and completed a

Ph.D. in geography at the University of Washington.  In the interim he taught

in China.  He joined the faculty at Colgate University as a professor of

geography in 1955 and founded there in 1971 one of the earliest peace studies

programs in the United States. He inspired many students to take seriously the

study of nonviolence and to pursue careers devoted to peace. Largely because of

Ted the Colgate program has a unique emphasis upon geography and trouble spots

in the world--like the Middle East, Central America, Africa, or Central

Asia--integrating trans-disciplinary academic approaches to war and peace with

the study of particular regional conflicts.



Ted Herman was a fantastic mentor.  He mentored me and many other young

professors in the nineteen eighties who were attracted to the field of peace

studies in response to the growing nuclear threat. I remember well meeting with

him at COPRED (Consortium on Peace Research, Education, and Development) and

International Peace Research Association (IPRA) conferences. His calm

determination and self confidence convinced many of us that we could leave the

shelter of our traditional disciplines and walk down the path of peace. Ted

Herman understood well how the study of peace could enhance the academy and

made it his life?s mission to promote it.



Ted Herman devoted considerable time to bringing together enemies on multiple

sides of the Balkan conflict.  In his retirement he often visited the Balkans

trying to get Serbs to talk to people from Bosnia-Herzegovina.	He helped

establish a peace studies program in Macedonia. I remember him coming to

Milwaukee in 1995 and meeting with an important Serbian bishop in the orthodox

church and leaders from the Bosnian community.



Towards the end of his life Ted Herman became convinced that the best way to

promote peace studies was through peace research. He threw his considerable

talents behind the International Peace Research Association Foundation (IPRAF)

a non-profit, tax-exempt organization founded in 1990 to further the purposes

of the International Peace Research Association (IPRA) and enhance the

processes of peace. With his support IPRAF has carried out peace research

projects in the Balkans and the Middle East.  It offers women from developing

countries scholarships to study peace at the graduate level and provides small

peace research grants to further the field of peace research. (For more

information see http://www.iprafoundation.org/) Ted Herman reveled in the rich

exchanges that took place at IPRA conferences where scholars from around the

world shared their insights into ways to generate peace.



Ted Hermann is held in the hearts of hundreds of peace educators and social

activists, like myself, who have been inspired by his quiet determination to

promote nonviolence. His memorial service will take place Jan 22, 2011 at 1

p.m. at Lancaster Friends Meeting in Lancaster, PA. I would like encourage

those of you who live in the area to consider attending this service to honor

an important pioneer in the field of peace and conflict studies.



Ian Harris