Nationalism, Anarchism, Reform: Understanding Political Islam from the Inside Out

Nationalism, Anarchism, Reform: Understanding Political Islam from the Inside Out

A lecture by James Gelvin

How can the United States identify its true enemies in what George W. Bush called the “Global War on Terror”? How useful and accurate are the labels such as “Islamo-fascist” or “violent extremist” in this task? This talk will lay out a framework for understanding political Islam in all its diversity. That framework is based on a close examination of the rhetorical battle currently being waged amongst Islamists themselves from pulpits and television studios, in print and in cyberspace.

January 21, 2011

12:30-2 PM

Science Center 101

Nationalism, Anarchism, Reform:

Understanding Political Islam

from the Inside Out

James L. Gelvin is professor of history at the University of California, Los Angeles. His research interests include the social and cultural history of Greater Syria during the late nineteenth/early twentieth centuries, Islamic movements, and nationalism in the Arab Middle East. He is author of Divided Loyalties: Nationalism and Mass Politics in Syria at the Close of Empire (1998), The Modern Middle East: A History (2004, 2007, 2011), and The Israel-Palestine Conflict: One Hundred Years of War (2005, 2007), along with numerous articles and chapters in edited volumes. He is presently co-editing a volume entitled, Circuits and Networks: Islam and Islamic Communities During the First Age of Globalization: 1815-1914.

Hosted by The Department of History Co-Sponsored by the French section of Modern Languages, Political Science, Religion, and Sociology and Anthropology Departments, and the Islamic Studies, and Peace & Conflict Studies Programs at Swarthmore College and the Middle East Center at the University of Pennsylvania

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