Mind It Is Blown

Me reading suggestions from Twitter about how to do some data visualizations of co-citations out of my Honors seminar on colonial Africa.

Some days the difference between a dilettante who just likes to read about cool stuff (me) and people who actually do cool stuff (them) is rather stark.

A list of the helpful, stimulating suggestions:

http://jgoodwin.net/ant-cites/cites-slider.html

http://scatter.wordpress.com/2013/07/17/clusters-of-sociology/

http://metalab.harvard.edu/2012/07/paper-machines/

http://www.scottbot.net/HIAL/?p=38272

http://nodexl.codeplex.com/

For starters.

I think the one difference in my concept from some of these examples is that I want to start with essentially a semantically-aware tagging process, e.g., I want the students and me to tag the citations that they see as being especially crucial or formative to the historiographical thinking of the scholars we’re reading based on what they’ve read, and then to do some exploration of how close our semantic intuitions are to actual networks of citation. But I think I can see how we could do this using some of these models.

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