Stories that Live

The Lang Center for Civic and Social Responsibility along with Casey Lu Simon-Plumb ’18 present:

Renate Writes: Stories from a Holocaust Survivor
Thursday April 21 4:30 PM
Keith Room, Lang Center

Ronnie Brewslow is a current PA resident who escaped from Nazi Germany in 1939. She was on the St. Louis headed for Cuba, but when the ship was denied dockage went to Rotterdam West, a detention camp in Holland. Thanks to the tenacity of her mother they were able to find a boat leaving for the USA from Belgium and reunited with her father in the United States. Ronnie is coming to share her story with us and do a question and answer session following her presentation. Good and refreshments will be provided.

This event is part of Swarthmore’s Human Rights Awareness Week Organized by Prof. Krista Thomason’s PHIL 051 class.

The Perils of Marriage Equality

Please join us for the lecture: The Perils of Marriage Equality

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Katherine Franke
Isidor and Seville Sulzbacher Professor of Law
Director, Center for Gender and Sexuality Law
Columbia University

Thursday, April 21, 2016
4:30pm Kohlberg 115

Professor Franke will discuss her new book, Wedlocked: The Perils of Marriage Equality: How African Americans and Gays Mistakenly Thought the Right to Marry Would Set Them Free.

Sponsored by Peace and Conflict Studies, Philosophy, Sociology & Anthropology, Gender & Sexuality Studies, Lang Center for Civic & Social Responsibility

Catalytic Diplomacy for Peace

Catalytic Diplomacy for Peace: Lessons Learned from the Half Century of Experience of Two Swarthmore Graduates

Jeremy J. Stone ‘57 Swarthmore College, Honorary Doctor of Laws for peace activities ’85 and B.J. Stone, ’57

On April 19, 2016, Dr. Jeremy Stone spoke to approximately 150 students in Science Center Room 101 at Swarthmore College

Creative ideas, pursued with personal diplomacy through political structures, can make a real difference to peace and conflict. Stone will reference successes and failures. These include inventing five tabled Washington-Moscow Summit arms control proposals. They also include: catalytic undertakings in initiating scientific exchange with China, Vietnam and Iran; efforts to end the Cambodian civil war; stabilizing the conflict between Mainland China and Taiwan; defending human rights in Russia and Constitutional rights in America; and a series of failures to reverse current American doctrine on first use of nuclear weapons.

Jeremy Stone in Science Center 101

Dr. Jeremy J. Stone graduated from Swarthmore College in 1957 before going on to complete a Ph.D. in mathematics from Stanford University. After holding positions at the Hudson Institute,  the Harvard Center for International Affairs (CFIA), and Pomona College, he became the CEO of the Federation of American Scientists (FAS)–founded in 1945 as the Federation of Atomic Scientists (FAS)– which focused on policy related to the nuclear arms race, human rights, ethnic violence and civil conflict, small arms, controlling biological and chemical weapons, energy conservation, global warming, and other related subjects.

Jeremy Stone

Through what Stone calls “catalytic diplomacy” and with the assistance of his wife, B.J. Stone ’57, they shaped a range of negotiations over nuclear weapons during the Cold War, played a key role in renewing scientific exchange with U.S. and China (1972) and U.S. and Iran (1999), and worked to contain super-Maoist movements in North Korea, Cambodia and Peru, among other topics.

Dr. Jeremy Stone

Swarthmore College awarded Dr. Stone an Honorary Doctor of Laws degree in 1985 for his career pursuing peace as a public interest activist. He is the author of two books on arms control: Containing the Arms Race: Some Specific Proposals (MIT Press, 1966) and Strategic Persuasion: Arms Limitations Through Dialogue (Columbia University Press, 1967) as well as two memoirs: Every Man Should Try: Adventures of a Public Interest Activist (Public Affairs Press, 1999) and Catalytic Diplomacy: Russia, China, North Korea, and Iran.

Stone testimony
Dr. Jeremy Stone ’57 lecturing, in June, 1979, to the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on the arms limitation treaty called SALT II. The Senators from left to right are: Charles Percy, Jacob Javits, Frank Church, George McGovern, and Joseph Biden.
Stone and Zhou En-lai
Dr. Jeremy Stone ’57 and his wife, B.J. Stone ’57, in 1972, negotiating, after dinner, with Prime Minister Zhou En-lai of the People’s Republic of China in 1972–a month after relations with Communist China were opened by President Nixon.

Sponsored by the Program in Peace and Conflict Studies and Catalytic Diplomacy

Download a flyer.

Quaker Indian Boarding Schools: Facing our History and Ourselves

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Wednesday April 13
7:00 PM
Scheuer Room, Kohlberg Hall

Quaker Indian Boarding Schools: Facing our History and Ourselves a public lecture by Moore Fellowship recipient Paula Palmer. Native American organizations are asking churches to join in a Truth and Reconciliation process to bring about healing for Native families that continue to suffer the consequences of the Indian boarding schools. With fellowships from Pendle Hill and Friends Historical Library, Paula Palmer researched the role that Friends played in implementing the federal government’s policy of forced assimilation of Native children. She will give an overview of the Quaker Indian boarding schools in New York, Iowa, Nebraska, Kansas, and Indian Territory (Oklahoma), and pose the query: Knowing what we know now about the impacts of forced assimilation, what does this history mean for Friends today?

Sponsored by the Friends Historical Library of Swarthmore College. Open to the public.

Upcoming Lecture: Adia Benton

Adia

Thursday March 24
4:30 PM, Kohlberg Hall 228

Join us for a lecture by Adia Benton Visiting Assistant Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard University and Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Northwestern University. The talk is entitled “Public Health in Post-Conflict African States”

In this talk, Prof. Benton asks the following questions: How do different African states respond to the public health challenges posed by HIV/AIDS, Ebola, and global emergency surgery? How is this complicated in post-conflict contexts? What role do international donors play in these interventions?

Sponsored by Peace and Conflict Studies, Black Studies, Biology, Sociology and Anthropology, Lang Center for Civic and Social Responsibility

Film Screening: Oriented

ORIENTED Film Screening
Tuesday, March 15, 2016
4:30 p.m.
LPAC Cinema

The documentary, “Oriented” directed and produced by Jake Witzenfeld, follows the lives of three gay Palestinian friends confronting their national and sexual identity in Tel Aviv, Israel.

The documentary follows the lives of Khader Abu Seif and his friends, Fadi and Naim. All three are gay Palestinian citizens of Israel who live and work in Tel Aviv. They are politically active and assertive about their right to define their own complex identity — and they’re not at all interested in conforming to the expectations of others.

Sponsored by Peace & Conflict Studies, Sociology and Anthropology, and the Lang Center for Civic and Social Responsibility.

Upcoming Lecture by Binalakshmi Nepram Manipur

Armed Conflict, Small Arms Proliferation and Women’s Non-Violent Peace Movement in Manipur

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Lecture by Binalakshmi Nepram Manipur Women Gun Survivor’s Network, Control Arms Foundation of India & Northeast India, and Women’s Initiative for Peace

Wednesday, March 2, 2016 4:30 p.m.
Science Center 101

Northeast India, home to 45 million people belonging to 272 ethnic groups, has been facing the onslaught of multiple armed conflicts for the last 60 years. This talk will unravel the Northeast Region of India, the complexities of the on-going conflicts, from the struggle over natural resources, ethnic strife, illegal migration, displacement and social exclusion, and discuss the unique and courageous way in which the Meira Paibis or the non-violent “Torch Bearer’s” Movement, led by women, has shown the path for peace and reconciliation. Binalakshmi (Bina) Nepram, born in the state of Manipur located in India’s Northeast region, is a writer and civil rights activist whose work focuses on women-led disarmament movements. She is the author of four books, a recipient of the Dalai Lama Foundation’s WISCOMP Scholar of Peace Award, 2008; the Sean MacBride Peace Prize, 2010; and the CNN IBN Real Heroes Award in 2011. In 2013, the London-based organization Action on Armed Violence named Nepram among the “100 most influential people in world working on armed violence reduction.”

A special luncheon with Bina Nepram has been organized on Thursday March 3, 2016 at 12:30 p.m. at the Lang Center for Civic and Social Responsibility. Due to limited seating, please contact Anna Everetts at aeveret1 if you would like to attend the luncheon.

Sponsored by: Asian Studies, Religion, Peace and Conflict Studies, Gender and Sexuality Studies, Sociology and Anthropology, Lang Center for Civic and Social Responsibility, the President’s Office, and DESHI.