Law as a Tool for Social Justice and Conflict Resolution

Law as a Tool for Social Justice and Conflict Resolution

Mark Schwartz ‘75

Tuesday, December 6th, 2016
4:30-6:00 p.m.
Kohlberg Hall, Room 228
Swarthmore College (directions)

This talk and discussion will feature a Swarthmore alum who has run his own private law practice for decades in service of social justice.

 

Mark Schwartz will discuss how the law can also be used as a tool for conflict resolution. Whether supporting the gay community in responding to discrimination, women facing workplace harassment, racist policies that
marginalize people of color, or whistleblowers exposing corruption in the public and private sectors, Schwartz works tirelessly to ensure that justice is served and that conflict is resolved fairly.

Sponsored by Peace and Conflict Studies, the Lang Center for Civic and Social Responsibility, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, and the Office of the Swarthmore Pre-Law Advisor

Diversity and Inclusion: Disabilities on Campus

From our friends in Global Neighbors:

Diversity and Inclusion: Considering the Role of Disabilities on Campus

Thursday, November 17, 4:30pm in the Scheuer Room

What is diversity and why have we been engaging with it predominantly through the lenses of race, gender, and class? Why is it that even though 25% of students on campus have a documented disability, disability is still left out of most conversations? What has Swarthmore done to accommodate for their needs? Are there still issues of accessibility and accommodation that students with disabilities face?

Join Global Neighbors and panelists Dean Shá Duncan Smith, Susan Smythe (ADA Coordinator), Leslie Hempling (Director of Student Disability Services), Donna Jo Napoli (Linguistics Department), Max Weinstein ‘19, and Lauren Knudson ‘19 as we engage in this discussion on how to broaden our ideas of diversity and inclusion.

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Race, War, and Police Power in the American Century

Race, War, and Police Power

Nikhil Pal Singh
(New York University)
Tuesday, November 15th
4:15 pm Sci 101

Drawing on his forthcoming book Exceptional Empire: Race, War and Sovereignty in U.S. Globalism (Harvard University Press 2017), Nikhil Singh will speak on the topic of race, war and police power in the ‘American Century.’

Nikhil Pal Singh

Dr. Singh is Associate Professor of Social and Cultural Analysis and History at New York University, where he also directs the NYU Prison Education Program. He is the author of Black is a Country: Race and the Unfinished Struggle for Democracy (Harvard UP, 2004), which won several prizes, including the Liberty Legacy Foundation Award for the best book in civil rights history from the Organization of American Historians in 2005.

He is the editor of Climbin’ Jacob’s Ladder: the Black Freedom Movement Writings of Jack O’Dell (University of California Press, 2010). Author of numerous essays on race, empire and U.S. liberalism, he is a member of the editorial board of the American Crossroads Book Series at the University of California Press.

Sponsored by the Department of Political Science, Black Studies Program, Lang Center for Civic and Social Responsibility, English Literature, Peace and Conflict Studies, and Sociology and Anthropology

Contact: obalkan1

Considering and challenging the legacy of “diversity”

LPAC Cinema at 6:30 PM on November 10th

Join Peripeteia’s Prelude panel discussion on “Diversity“, together with Swarthmore College’s

  • President Val Smith, Peace & Conflict Studies
  • Professor Sa’ed Atshan
  • History Professor Allison Dorsey.

The Prelude discussion series hosts panelists from different disciplines to unpack and engage in
complex topics like “diversity.”

In an increasingly globalized world, how do we approach and reconcile the differences amidst the interaction of various backgrounds, identities, and
perspectives?

Take part in this conversation in LPAC Cinema at 6:30 PM on November 10th as we consider and challenge the legacy of “diversity”.

**there will be refreshments**

peripeteia_f16_diversity_poster-notitles

Spring 2017 course: Strategy and Nonviolent Struggle

PEAC 071B / SOCI 071B / POLS 081 Strategy and Nonviolent Struggle is a research seminar and writing course that contributes to the widely recognized Global Nonviolent Action Database, which is housed at Swarthmore College. See http://nvdatabase.swarthmore.edu

Great news: The course will be offered during the spring semester of 2017!  Got questions?  Contact Prof. Lee Smithey at lsmithe1. More information is available below. Spaces are limited.

This one-credit research seminar involves working and updating the Global Nonviolent Action Database website which can be accessed by activists and scholars worldwide at http://nvdatabase.swarthmore.edu The Global Nonviolent Action Database was built at Swarthmore College and includes more than 1,400 cases of “people power” drawn from dozens of countries.  The database contains crucial information on campaigns for human rights, democracy, environmental sustainability, economic justice, national/ethnic identity, and peace.

Students will research a series of cases and write them up in two ways: within a template of fields (the database proper) and also as a 2-3 page narrative that describes the unfolding struggle.  In addition to research/writing methods, students will also draw theories in the field.  Strategic implications for today will be drawn from theory and from what the group learns from the documented cases of wins and losses experienced by people’s struggles.

1 credit.  Writing course.  Enrollment limited to 12 students.

Lee Smithey
Thursday 1:15-4:00
Lang Center 106

Global Nonviolent Action Database

 

Quaker Indian Boarding Schools and Moral Economies at Pendle Hill

It’s an exciting fall semester of programming across Crum Woods at Pendle Hill Quaker Retreat Center. Check out these events coming up in November and December!

The Quaker Indian Boarding Schools: Facing our History and Ourselves

Monday, November 7, 2016
Free
7:00pm-9:00pm in the barn, livestreaming available

quaker_indian_school_haverfordIn the 1800s, Quakers and other Christian denominations collaborated with the U.S. government’s policy of forced assimilation of Native peoples. Paula Palmer has been led to research these schools and take the first steps towards truth and reconciliation on behalf of the Religious Society of Friends with support from Pendle Hill (the 2016 Cadbury Scholarship), Swarthmore College (the 2015 Moore Fellowship), and the Native American Rights Fund.  This is a part of Pendle Hill’s free and open to the public First Monday lecture series. 


Visioning and Creating a Moral Economy Conference

December 1st (4:00pm) to 4th (noon)
Sliding scale $300-$600 (financial aid also available)

Co-sponsored by Quaker Institute for the Future, New Economy Coalition, and the Philadelphia Area Cooperative Alliance.

pendlehill_moral_economies_f16What does a moral economy look like? What are the challenges that confront us in establishing it? What opportunities do the precarious state of global capitalism and accelerating climate change provide to galvanize action? What are the incremental and intermediate steps already being taken to bring forth our common vision? How do we build on those efforts to establish them on a larger scale?  The conference will include plenary sessions with speakers and panels, open forum small group discussions, workshops, and whole group visioning and action sessions.  Speakers include Political Economist Gar Alperovitz, Social Movement theorist George Lakey, Esteban Kelley, Executive Director of the US Federation of Workers Cooperatives and Rahwa Ghirmatzion, Deputy Director of PUSH Buffalo. 


George Lakey First Monday

Monday, December 5, 2016
Free
7:00pm-9:00pm in the barn, livestreaming available

george_lakey_2013_ph

In our First Monday forum, George will share insights from his research and writing on the Scandinavian Economies and respond to our questions about how we can use the Scandinavian models to create the kind of moral political economy that puts people’s welfare first and benefits the whole society in terms of health, security, and happiness.

Amnesty or Expulsion: What Our Religious Traditions Teach Us about Dealing with Undocumented Immigrants

The Interfaith Center invites you to its inaugural discussion in its Religion and Society series entitled:

“Amnesty or Expulsion: What Our Religious Traditions Teach Us about Dealing with Undocumented Immigrants”

Wednesday, November 2 from 4:30pm to 6:00pm in Bond Hall

The discussion will be led by:

  • Aurora Camacho de Schmidt, Professor Emeritus and Immigrant Rights Advocate
  • Umar Abdul Rahman, Muslim Student Advisor and former Immigration Attorney

Co-Sponsors: Lang Center for Civic and Social Responsibility, Office of International Student Services, Peace and Conflict Studies Program, Intercultural Center (IC)

PEAC courses for Spring 2017!

Check out all the great Peace and Conflict Studies courses on offer this spring 2017!

Peace and Conflict Studies Courses
Spring 2017

givingwater

PEAC 003.  Crisis Resolution in the Middle East

Eligible for POLS and ISLM credit

This introductory course is designed for students without a background in Peace and Conflict Studies or Middle East Studies. Central questions include: How do we define crises in the contemporary Middle East/North Africa region? How does the nature of the crisis (political, economic, social, and environmental) impact communities differently? How are grassroots actors, civil society institutions, states, and international organizations responding to these challenges in their nation-states and across borders? What transnational networks of solidarity have linked the Middle East to other regions across the globe? For instance, this course will examine the consequences of environmental degradation and escalating food prices on conflict and instability across the region. We will trace the origins of autocratic regimes in the Middle East and social movements calling for rights and reforms on one hand and the rise of fundamentalism and terrorism (i.e. Al-Qaeda and ISIS). Furthermore, the course will explore crises such as contemporary Syria, and how local and international interventions aimed at reversing the marginalization of-and threats against-minority populations (ethnic, religious, gender, sexuality, ability) have come to constitute a realm of crisis management. By understanding crises through the theoretical prism of human security frameworks, we will ascertain the prospects for democratization, development, pluralism, and peace in the region.

Sa’ed Atshan; Tuesdays 1:15-4:00; Kohlberg 116


love

PEAC 043.  Gender, Sexuality and Social Change

Eligible for GSST credit

How has gender emerged as an analytical category? How has sexuality emerged as an analytical category? What role did discourses surrounding gender and sexuality play in the context of Western colonialism in the Global South historically as well as in the context of Western imperialism in the Global South today? How are gender and sexuality-based liberation understood differently around the world? What global social movements have surfaced to codify rights for women and LGBTQ populations? How has the global human rights apparatus shaped the experiences of women and queer communities? What is the relationship between gender and masculinity? What are the promises and limits of homo-nationalism and pink-washing as theoretical frameworks in our understanding of LGBT rights discourses? When considering the relationship between faith and homosexuality, how are religious actors queering theology? How do we define social change with such attention to gender and sexuality?  1 credit.

Sa’ed Atshan; Mondays 1:15-4:00; Science Center 105



entrepreneur

PEAC 049. Social Entrepreneurship in Principle and Practice

Amidst market implosions, human conflict, environmental crises, and on-going demise of the welfare state, the need for new, durable organizational forms, committed to social change, is clear.  Social entrepreneurship offers a unique model for creative conflict transformation and community problem solving. Using business practices, social enterprises seek to redress social and environmental concerns while generating revenue.  Students will learn about the manifestation of social entrepreneurship principles and practice in non-profit, for-profit, and hybrid organizations.  Then, students will draft plans for their own social enterprise, thereby garnering a deeper understanding of social enterprise as organizational forms, while also embarking on a journey to explore their own potential as social entrepreneurs.  1 credit.

Denise Crossan, Lang Professor for Social Change; Tuesday/Thursday 8:30-10:30; Lang Center 112



peacemap

PEAC 071B Research Seminar: Strategy and Nonviolent Struggle

 (Cross-listed as SOAN 071B)

This one-credit research seminar involves working and updating the Global Nonviolent Action Database website which can be accessed by activists and scholars worldwide at http://nvdatabase.swarthmore.edu The Global Nonviolent Action Database was built at Swarthmore College and includes cases of “people power” drawn from dozens of countries.  The database contains crucial information on campaigns for human rights, democracy, environmental sustainability, economic justice, national/ethnic identity, and peace.  Students will be expected to research a series of cases and write them up in two ways: within a template of fields (the database proper) and also as a 2-3 page narrative that describes the unfolding struggle.  In addition to research/writing methods, students will also draw theories in the field.  Strategic implications for today will be drawn from theory and from what the group learns from the documented cases of wins and losses experienced by people’s struggles.  1 credit.  Writing course.  Enrollment limited to 12 students.

Lee Smithey;  Thursday 1:15-4:00;  Lang Center 106


boyrefugee

PEAC 103.  Humanitarianism:  Anthropological Approaches

(Cross-listed with SOAN 103)

This honors 2-credit seminar will introduce students to the most salient theoretical debates among anthropologists on humanitarian intervention around the world.  We will also examine a range of case studies, from the birth of Western Christian humanitarian missions in colonial contexts to humanitarian interventions (e.g. military, food-based assistance, natural disaster relief, post-conflict reconstruction) today.  The geographic scope of this seminar will encompass North America, South America, the Caribbean, Europe, sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East/North Africa, East Asia, and South Asia.  We will consider, for instance, how anthropologists have examined relief efforts in the wake of Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans.  What social science scholarship has been produced on mental health interventions after political and natural crises in Haiti? How are victims of torture at the hands of the Indian military supported by international organizations in Kashmir?  What is the nature of global Islamic humanitarianism today?  How are local national staff employed by international organizations shaping humanitarian approaches to gender-based violence in Colombia?  These are among the many questions we will address over the course of the semester.

Sa’ed Atshan; Wednesdays 1:15-4:00; Kohlberg 226