Moore Research Fellowship at Swarthmore College

Interested in conducting research in the Friends Historical Library or the Peace Collection at Swarthmore College?  Apply for the Moore Research Fellowship!

Margaret W. Moore and John M. Moore Research Fellowship
Swarthmore College

SYNOPSIS:  The purpose of the Margaret W. Moore and John M. Moore Research Fellowship is to provide a stipend to promote research during the academic year or summer months using the resources of the Friends Historical Library and/or the Swarthmore College Peace Collection.

Deadline(s):      03/31/2015
Established Date: 04/10/2003
Follow-Up Date:   02/01/2016
Review Date:      02/26/2015

Contact:  Christopher Densmore, Curator

Address:
Friends Historical Library of Swarthmore College
500 College Avenue
Swarthmore, PA 19081-1399
U.S.A.

E-mail:  cdensmo1@swarthmore.edu
Web Site: http://www.swarthmore.edu/library/peace/
Program URL: http://bit.ly/185AMb7
Tel:              610-328-8557
Deadline Ind:     Receipt
Deadline Open:    No

Award Type(s):    Facilities-Access To Fellowship Summer

Citizenship/Country of Applying Institution: Any/No Restrictions

Locations Tenable:    U.S.A. Institution (including U.S. Territories)

Appl Type(s):

  • Faculty Member
  • Researcher/Investigator
  • Graduate Student

Target Group(s):  NONE
Funding Limit:    $0   NOT PROV
Duration: 0
Indirect Costs: Unspecified
Cost Sharing: No
Sponsor Type:  College/University
Geo. Restricted:  NO RESTRICTIONS

OBJECTIVES:  The purpose of the Margaret W. Moore and John M.
Moore Research Fellowship is to provide a stipend to promote research during the academic year or summer months using the resources of the Friends Historical Library and/or the Swarthmore College Peace Collection. Strong preference will be given to projects utilizing resources only available at Swarthmore. Moore fellows will be asked to give a lecture at Swarthmore College subsequent to and based upon their research at a date agreed upon by the Moore Fellowship Committee and the Moore fellow.

ELIGIBILITY
Those eligible to apply include Swarthmore College students and
faculty, as well as faculty, graduate students, and scholars from
outside the Swarthmore College community.

FUNDING
The amount of the stipend will be announced.  (jap)

KEYWORDS:

  • American History
  • Religious History
  • Conflict/Dispute Resolution
  • Social Change
  • Peace/Disarmament/Amnesty

Stanley Hauerwas to speak on “light”

“How to think about light theologically”
A lecture by Dr. Stanley Hauerwas

Where: Bond Memorial Hall at Swarthmore College (directions)
When: Monday, February 23rd at 7:00 pm

Dr. Stanley Hauerwas is perhaps the most famous American
ethicist-theologian alive today.  Dr. Hauerwas is currently the Gilbert T. Rowe Professor of theological ethics at Duke Divinity School where he  also holds a joint appointment in the Duke University School of Law.

Hauerwas1

Among his many honors, Dr. Hauerwas was named in 2001 “America’s best theologian” by TIME magazine.  Also in 2001, Hauerwas delivered the prestigious Gifford Lectures at St. Andrews College in Scotland.

As the country’s foremost Christian pacifist, Hauerwas has written on a wide range of topics from war, peace, law, American politics, the Christian Church and ethics.  In ethics, Dr. Hauerwas has been at the forefront of the resurgence of Aristotelian virtue ethics in the American academy.

This task he undertook in collaboration with the equally renowned
philosopher, Dr. Alasdair MacIntyre, with whom he worked and taught for many years.  This Monday at 7pm in Bond Memorial Hall, Dr. Hauerwas will speak on the topic “How to think about light theologically.”  Don’t miss this lecture by one of the most famous living pacifists and theologians!

Contact: ekast1

Theater of Witness covers new ranges of emotional spectrum

The following piece appeared in the most recent issue of The Phoenix.

Theater of Witness covers new ranges of emotional spectrum

Theater of Witness is a series of staged dramatic performances and cinema pieces through which subjects recount complex personal histories. It was brought to Swarthmore on Monday, February 10 by its founder and director Teya Sepinuck. Sepinuck served as adjunct faculty in member in the college’s dance department for almost 20 years before leaving to found the Philadelphia-based TOVA: Artistic Projects for Social Change in 1991. More recently, she has been in Northern Ireland expanding the Theater of Witness program.The program opened with Sepinuck reading a short passage from her book, describing an encounter with children who were unwitting victims of war. It seemed generic, too distant to be meaningful. Sepinuck then moved towards presenting the actual “theater” of witness.She started with some footage of a young boy narrating on and off camera, accompanied by footage of his Philadelphia neighborhood. It is part of a piece connecting mothers of young gang violence victims to the perpetrators of said violence. The relationship between victim and perpetrator is essential and unique to Sepinuck’s work.“It’s harder to identify with the perpetrator,” said Sepinuck. “But it’s important.”Teya SepinuckAfter a brief and interesting, if not completely comprehensive, introduction to the methods of the program, Sepinuck showed a few particularly powerful Theater of Witness performances.The first video featured a man named Hakim Ali telling his story. Ali had committed acts of gang violence, and had not spoken about it or outwardly reflected on it before participating in Sepinuck’s program.

“It’s very healing,” said Sepinuck.

On stage he is full of emotion, the kind of regret and loss that is easy to feel and almost impossible to communicate. Sepinuck shared a story about how the mothers of victims and convicted perpetrators alike were in tears, moved to unabridged expression by the stories of their sons. But none of them were shown on screen, and the distance remained.

Next was the story of a couple from Sepinuck’s film “Raising Our Voice.” The work was inspired by a man who called Sepinuck, requesting to participate after having seen one of her programs. He confessed to committing domestic abuse and told Sepinuck that he kept hearing her name when he was praying. The film opens with a monologue from the man’s wife, who decided to participate in the program after watching him. She fights tears on screen as she outlines a history of helplessness and running away, ending on a note of strength and confidence. The scene then cuts to the man’s own story as the film follows him through a saga of masculine pressure that poisoned his protective instincts of love. The two end up on stage together, dancing closely. The “healing” capability that Sepinuck had referred to earlier was more than just cathartic introspection. It unifies parties that have damaged each other. As the couple dances on screen, there is not exactly forgiveness, but there is still love.

Sepinuck then presented her more recent work on the lives of those who had lost loved ones due to separatist and military violence in northern Ireland. She showed individually narrated short films: one of a young woman named Victoria, whose father was killed in an IRA related bomb attack and one of a young man named Fionbarr, whose father died at the hands of suspicious British police. Sepinuck then showed a Theater of Witness project featuring a young woman who had given herself to the IRA years ago as she tells the story of her impassioned extremism and its abrupt end due to a brain hemorrhage. She is then shown on stage together with the wives of men killed by IRA activity, in an example of the show’s careful exploration of the relativism of innocence and the universality of pain.

To conclude, Sepinuck showed material from her film “Living with Life”, a Theater of Witness project done at the State Correctional Institute in nearby Chester. A group of men sentenced to life in prison are interviewed about their free lives and current emotions at an unexpected, almost inconceivable depth. This is followed by their performance of an original composition by the prisoners, about how they must hold on to some fragments of sanity while confined. It is a perspective on life that, as consumers of a media saturated with grotesquely fantasized prison environments, is almost never seen.

Lakey workshop “Get on your feet: Organizing for Peaceful Protest”

GET ON YOUR FEET: ORGANIZING FOR PEACEFUL PROTEST
A workshop with George Lakey

Thursday, February 26
7:00 – 10:30 p.m.
Keith Room – Lang Center for Civic and Social Responsibility
Swarthmore College (Directions)

George Lakey

You *can* go beyond the boring limits of choosing between a march or a rally by coming to this workshop and learning about:

  • action logic
  • edgy actions
  • using actions leadership development
  • maximizing the empowerment potential of the actions you design
  • one-offs vs. campaigns

The workshop includes question time on the use of nonviolent direct action compared with other techniques for social change.

George Lakey is formerly a Lang Professor in Peace and Conflict Studies at Swarthmore College. He founded the Global Nonviolent Action Database.

Engaging Human Differences: a teach in with Professor David Kyuman Kim

Engaging Human Differences:
teach in with Professor David Kyuman Kim

February 19, 2015
7:00 – 9:00 p.m. in Kohlberg Hall Room 116
Swarthmore College (directions)

Ferguson, Staten Island/NYC, Paris. Philadelphia. In this time of intensifying and proliferating tensions regarding how the law and the police state engage human differences of race, religion, gender, sexuality, and class (amongst many others), the need to find language and spaces of dialogue have become more urgent. ​

For this event, David Kyuman Kim (Connecticut College scholar of race, religion, and public life) will lead a teach-in with the Swarthmore community taking up these issues, especially as they effect the stakeholders of Swarthmore. A successful teach-in will take the temperature of the constituents of Swarthmore (students, staff, faculty, and local community) in regard to these tensions around race and the like, and build-up an organic dialogue that will serve as a catalyst for on-going conversations at Swarthmore and beyond.

David K. Kim

Sample questions:

  • How has Swarthmore engaged questions of race, religion, and public life?
  • How have Swarthmore’s initiatives around diversity helped and/or hindered an effective dialogue that enables students, staff, and faculty to engage what is happening in Ferguson, NYC, and beyond?
  • What discourses around race, religion, gender, sexuality, class, and state authority are working and which are not working at Swarthmore? And how might we begin a conversation to transform these discourses to help equip the community to be more effective in addressing these pressing issues?

This event is part of the ongoing residency: Radical Democracy and Humanism: Intersections between Performance and Action

Theatre of Witness: Bearing Witness to Stories of Suffering, Transformation, and Peace

Theatre of Witness: Bearing Witness to Stories of Suffering, Transformation, and Peace

A Public Presentation by Teya Sepinuck
Monday, February 9th, 7 pm
Lang Performing Arts Center Cinema
Swarthmore College (directions)
Free and Open to the Public

Join Teya Sepinuck, founder and Artistic Director of Theatre of Witness for an inspiring multi-media program of films and life stories from her work creating original testimonial theater with those whose stories haven’t been heard in society. For the past 29 years, Teya has created Theatre of Witness productions in the US, Poland and Northern Ireland with ex-combatants, victims and survivors of war, prisoners and their families, refugees, and asylum seekers, and those affected by inner city violence, poverty and homelessness. Teya will speak personally about the power of bearing witness and using personal and collective story to inspire healing and peace building both for the performers as well as audiences.

Teya Sepinuck

Teya is the founder and artistic Director of Theatre of Witness – a form of performance in which the true life stories of those who haven’t been heard in society are performed by the people themselves as a way for audiences to bear witness to issues of suffering, transformation and peace. She is recently back from Northern Ireland where The European Union awarded two multi-year Peace grants for her work with former soldiers, security forces personnel, and victims and witnesses of the more than 40 years of violence from the ‘Troubles’. The productions have since been made into film documentaries for ongoing dissemination in workshops, and one of her most recent productions has aired on the BBC. Her work humanizes the other and is founded on the premise of ‘finding the medicine’ in stories of deep suffering. Teya’s book, Theatre of Witness, Finding the Medicine in Stories of Suffering, Transformation and Peace was published by Jessica Kingsley Press. Teya taught at Swarthmore College from 1974-2002.

Sponsored by: SWARTHMORE COLLEGE Departments of Music and Dance and Theatre, Programs in Black Studies and Peace and Conflict Studies, the Lang Center for Civic and Social Responsibility and the William J Cooper Foundation

 

Radical Democracy and Humanism: Intersections between Performance and Action

It is our privilege to be a co-sponsor of events in the David Dorfman Performance Residency!

RADICAL DEMOCRACY AND HUMANISM: INTERSECTIONS BETWEEN PERFORMANCE AND ACTION

WITH DAVID DORFMAN DANCE AND OTHERS

Swarthmore College (Departments and Programs of Music and Dance, Black Studies, Peace and Conflict Studies, Theatre, and the Lang Center for Civic and Social Responsibility) and the William J. Cooper Foundation present a three-week performance residency RADICAL DEMOCRACY AND HUMANISM: INTERSECTIONS BETWEEN PERFORMANCE AND ACTION. Conceived by Professor Sharon Friedler and led by Swarthmore graduate Kate Speer ‘08, the residency centers around engagements with David Dorfman Dance (DDD), a leading American modern dance company known for politically relevant works centered on community responsibility. From February 9 to February 27, 2015, workshops, classes and lectures will address a spectrum of positions and assumptions regarding intersecting issues of race, class, gender, sexuality, religion, politics and the environment.

Participating facilitators include the following scholars and artists: Kate Speer ‘08, who has written and delivered papers on Dorfman’s dances, creative processes, and their connection to radical democracy, Teya Sepinuck, the founder and director of the Theater of Witness model of performance, David Kyuman Kim, a Connecticut College scholar of race, religion, and public life and George Lakey, visiting professor, non-violence advocate and civil rights activist. In the lectures and workshops, selections of David Dorfman’s repertory works will be taught as aids in broadening individual performing range and exposure to these processes will provide a common basis for the study and discussion of different aspects of performance. Discussions will delve into multiple opinions and perspectives in order to encourage participants to begin dialoguing about the questions at stake, effectively employing democratic practices within the concert stage environment. The residency will seek to explore how Dorfman creates dance that de-stigmatizes the notion of accessibility and interaction in post-modern performance and how dance can add a positive challenge to engage audiences in action.

The residency schedule of events free and open to the public at Swarthmore College will be as follows:

1st Week

February 9, 7-9PM, Lang Performing Arts Center Cinema
Presentation:“Theatre of Witness” with Teya Sepinuck

February 12, 4:30 – 6PM, Lang Performing Arts Center Troy Dance Lab (LPAC 2)
Movement Workshop: David Dorfman and the Active Citizen with Kate Speer

February 15, 1-5PM, Lang Performing Arts Center Boyer Studio (LPAC 3)
Workshop: “Theatre of Witness” with Teya Sepinuck

2nd Week

February 19, 4:30 – 6PM, Lang Performing Arts Center Troy Dance Lab (LPAC 2)Master Class in dance: David Dorfman and company

February 19, 7-9PM, Kohlberg 116
“Engaging Human Differences: Teaching Dialogue and Discourse about Race, Religion and Public Life”
Teach-in with David Kyuman Kim

February 20, 8PM, Lang Performing Arts Center, Pearson-Hall Theatre
DDD, PROPHETS OF FUNK

Final Week

February 24, 2:40-4PM, Lang Music 407
Lecture/Discussion: “Between Apathy and Action” with Kate Speer

February 26, 7-10:30PM, Keith Room, Lang Center for Social Responsibility
Workshop:“Get on Your Feet: Organizing for Peaceful Protest” with George Lakey

All events are free and open to the public without reservation. Seating may be limited for some events and is first come, first served.

The central performance event, David Dorfman’s PROPHETS OF FUNK, is on Friday, February 20 at 8PM is in the Lang Performing Arts Center’s Pearson-Hall Theater. DDD celebrates the band’s groundbreaking, visceral, and powerful visions of prophetic love that continue to shine on despite everyday struggles. PROPHETS OF FUNK lifts up the spirit of Sly: that in the face of the funk of life, there are still hopes and aspirations that reside in all of us. The production of PROPHETS OF FUNK was made possible by generous support from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, The Harkness Foundation for Dance, The New England Foundation for the Arts, National Dance Project with funding from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, The Fan Fox and Leslie R. Samuels Foundation, New York State Council on the Arts, The Jerome Robbins Foundation, and Friends of David Dorfman Dance. Choreographic material for PROPHETS OF FUNK was developed, in part, during residencies at the Tisch Dance Summer Residency Program at New York University and as company-in-residence at Connecticut College.

For further information about these events, contact Tara Webb at 610-328-8260 or lpacevents@swarthmore.edu. These events are free and open to the public without reservations, but space is limited for some of the smaller lectures and workshops.  More details about the schedule of events available at: http://www.swarthmore.edu/dance-program and on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Swarthmore-College-Dance-Program/200840063275757

 

[Click on the link below to zoom in.]

Radical Democracy and Humanism flyer

Black/Latin@ Identity and Solidarity in #Blacklivesmatter Organizing

Black/Latin@ Identity and Solidarity in #Blacklivesmatter Organizing

Rosa Alicia Clemente
Grassroots Organizer, Hip-Hop Activist, Journalist

February 19, 7-8:30pm (ending time subject to change)
Location: Science Center Room 101

Rosa Alicia Clemente is a Black Puerto Rican grassroots organizer, hip-hop activist, journalist, and entrepreneur. She was the vice presidential running mate of 2008 Green Party Presidential candidate Cynthia McKinney in the 2008 U.S. Presidential election.Rosa Clemente

Clemente’s academic work has focused on research of national liberation struggles within the United States, with a specific focus on the Young Lords Party and the Black Liberation Army.While a student at SUNY Albany, she was President of the Albany State University Black Alliance (ASUBA) and Director of Multicultural Affairs for the Student Association. At Cornell she was a founding member of La Voz Boriken, a social/political organization dedicated to supporting Puerto Rican political prisoners and the independence of Puerto Rico.

[Click on the image below to see a larger image  of the flyer.]

rosaclemente

Deadline for Davis Projects for Peace applications extended!

The deadline for applications for the Davis Project for Peace  competition has been extended!

Proposals now due: February 9, 2015, Noon

 Open to students from any class year as well as individuals or groups of students, the Davis Project for Peace grant seeks to fund student initiative, innovation, and entrepreneurship that focuses on conflict prevention, resolution, peacebuilding, or reconciliation in the U.S. and around the world.

Questions? Contact Jennifer Magee (jmagee1).

 DavisProjectsPeace.jpg

Black History Month – February 2015

Let us draw your attention to this announcement about Black History Month from our friends in The Black Cultural Center

Black History Month – February 2015

The events below are a part of the Black History Month series of events for 2015, sponsored by The Black Cultural CenterBlack StudiesThe Dean’s Office, The Office of the President, and The Student Budget Committee. We are grateful to the many programs and departments who contributed to the funding of these events.

Black History Month Kickoff Luncheon: Student, Faculty, and Staff Meet and Greet

February 4, 12:30-2pm
Location: Black Cultural Center (BCC)

Join the BCC Community by networking and mingling with faculty, staff, and students. Celebrate with great conversation, a delicious lunch and good tunes.

Kevin Snipes: Uncontained

Exhibition of approximately 16 recent ceramic works

January 22 – February 26

Kevin Snipes embellishes his unconventional ceramic forms with an
inventive array of drawn and painted imagery. Using traditional pottery surface techniques such as mishima and sgraffito, both of which involve carving away part of the surface of the porcelain clay body, he suggests multi-layered narratives. His animated drawings, implied narratives, humorous juxtapositions, and complex surfaces explore the concepts of identity and otherness. Like contemporary artists such as Aaron MacGruder, creator of /The Boondocks /comic strip and British artist, Grayson Perry, Snipes inscribes the rarified medium of porcelain with a vernacular language that is at once confessional, urban, idiosyncratic, and ironic.

Snipes was born in Philadelphia and raised in Cleveland, Ohio. He
received a B.F.A. in ceramics and drawing from the Cleveland Institute of Art in 1994. After pursuing graduate studies at the University of Florida in 2003, Snipes participated in numerous artist residency programs, including at the Clay Studio in Philadelphia; Watershed Center for Ceramic Arts, in New Castle, Maine; Northern Clay Center, Minneapolis; and A.I.R. in Vallauris, France. He received a Taunt Fellowship from the Archie Bray Foundation in Montana in 2008. In 2014, he was awarded a Joan Mitchell Foundation grant. He has exhibited both nationally and internationally, including a at the Society of Arts and
Craft, Boston; AKAR Design, Iowa City; and Duane Reed Gallery, St.
Louis; and Jingdezhen, China.

Black Photographers and the Emergence of a People

Film by Thomas Allen Harris

February 4, 4:30pm
Kohlberg Scheuer Room

Screening followed by panel discussion.Panelists:Deborah Willis, NYU Tisch School of the Arts and Ron Tarver, Swarthmore College

“1969: The Revolutionary Spring of Black Students”

Dr. Ibram X. Kendi

February 5, Kohlberg Scheuer Room 4:30pm

From 1965 to 1972, Black students and their allies waged the most transformative antiracist social movement in the history of U.S. education.  They organized, demanded, and protested for a relevant learning experience at more than five hundred colleges and universities in every state except Alaska.  They pressed for a range of campus reforms, including an end to campus paternalism and racism, and the addition of more Black students, faculty, Black Cultural Centers, and Africana Studies courses and programs.  The spring of 1969 was undoubtedly the climax semester of this social movement.  From Swarthmore to Cornell, from Duke to Wisconsin, from UCLA to UC Berkeley, Black students and their allies revolutionized the course of higher education for decades to come.

BIO: Dr. Ibram X. Kendi [KEN-DEE] is an assistant professor in the
Department of Africana Studies at the University at Albany — SUNY.  He authored the award-winning book, The Black Campus Movement: Black Students and the Racial Reconstitution of Higher Education, 1965-1972, the first national study of black student activism in the late 1960s and early 1970s.  His second book is entitled Dead Letters: A Narrative History of Racist Ideas, 1453 to the Present, published by Nation Books. Dead Letters chronicles the fierce, complex, multi-century clash between racist ideas as well as between racist and antiracist ideas, sometimes within one piece of literature. /Dead Letters/ is unique among histories of racist ideas through its use of intersectional theory.  It consistently portrays the intersections of racist ideas with notions of gender, class, ethnicity, place, culture, sexuality, and immigration. Dead Letters is also the first transnational history of racist ideas to span from their origination in fifteenth century Portugal, their travel to England by the mid-sixteenth century, their settling in America in the seventeenth century, the blossoming of racist ideas in the United States from the eighteenth to the twentieth centuries, to their persistence in the twenty-first century.

Dr. Kendi has published twelve essays on the Black Campus Movement, black power, and intellectual history in books and referred academic journals.  He has earned research appointments, fellowships, and grants from the American Historical Association, National Academy of Education, Chicago’s Black Metropolis Research Consortium, Rutgers Center for Historical Analysis, Lyndon B. Johnson Library & Museum, Princeton University, Brown University, University of Chicago, Emory, Duke, and UCLA.  Currently, Dr. Kendi is working on the first national study of
the origin of Black Studies, Black Students and Black Studies: A
Founding History, 1966-1970.

Student Panel – Black Liberation 1969

Students will present their research on Swarthmore’s Black Student Movement, 1968-1972.

February 10, 4:30-6pm
Kohlberg, Scheuer Room
reception immediately following discussion.

Leandre Jackson Photo Exhibit:  Proof of Black Life:The Photography of Leandre Jackson

February 17 – March 15
McCabe Lobby

“Black/Latin@ Identity and Solidarity in #Blacklivesmatter Organizing”*

Rosa Alicia Clemente
Grassroots Organizer, Hip-Hop Activist, Journalist

February 19, 7-8:30pm (ending time subject to change)
Location:SCI 101

Rosa Alicia Clemente is a Black Puerto Rican grassroots organizer, hip-hop activist, journalist, and entrepreneur. She was the vice presidential running mate of 2008 Green Party Presidential candidate Cynthia McKinney in the 2008 U.S. Presidential election.

Clemente’s academic work has focused on research of national liberation struggles within the United States, with a specific focus on the Young Lords Party and the Black Liberation Army.While a student at SUNY Albany, she was President of the Albany State University Black Alliance (ASUBA) and Director of Multicultural Affairs for the Student Association. At Cornell she was a founding member of La Voz Boriken, a social/political organization dedicated to supporting Puerto Rican political prisoners and the independence of Puerto Rico.

Gospel Choir Concert: Make a Joyful Noise

February 21, 4-6pm
Location:Friends Meeting House

Come have your spirits lifted at the Gospel Choir concert! Enjoy songs, dancing and fun. Reception immediately following concert.

“The Black Revolution on Campus: Black Students and the Transformation of Higher Education”

Martha Biondi**

February 26
LPAC Cinema
4:30pm, reception immediately following talk

Activism rocked American campuses in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Black students were at the forefront of this nationwide youth uprising, and they helped push the Black freedom struggle to embrace the radical transformation of higher education. The students faced strong resistance but they won many demands, leaving a legacy that profoundly reshaped campus life in the 1970s and beyond.

Martha Biondi is a Professor of African American Studies and
History at Northwestern University where she currently serves as Chair of the Department of African American Studies. Her book, The Black Revolution on Campus, won the Wesley-Logan Prize for an outstanding study of African Diaspora history from the American HIstorical Association as well as the National Book Award from the Benjamin L. Hooks Institute for Social Change at the University of Memphis. She is also the author of the award-winning /To Stand and Fight: the Struggle for Civil Rights in Postwar New York City/, the first book-length study of the civil rights movement in the North.*__*

Black Love Formal

February 28
6pm
Location:Upper Tarble

Join Swarthmore, Bryn Mawr and Haverford Colleges at the annual Black love Formal banquet: A night of mingling, dinner, and dancing.

Contact Louis Laine ’16 at llaine1 for more information.