Dee Craig’s latest mural in Northern Ireland

Lee Smithey had the opportunity to meet up in Belfast, Northern Ireland with Dee Craig a couple of weeks ago. Dee is the artist who painted the mural on the Science Center here at Swarthmore. (See photos, video, and more.)

Here is his latest piece on the Newtownards Road in East Belfast!

Craig Achieve mural

Dee sends warm greetings to all of his friends at Swarthmore!

 

How Nonviolent Movements Can Deal with Repression and Violence

Civil Resistance

Prof. Lee Smithey will be part of a guest Twitter panel on “How Nonviolent Movements Can Deal with Repression and Violence” on Thursday, August 20 at 10:00 – 11:00 a.m. EST

The panel is being sponsored by the United States Institute of Peace Global Campus course on “Civil Resistance and the Dynamics of Nonviolent Movements.”

Follow #pdoxrep on Twitter on Thursday and feel free to participate!

Professor Smithey is completing an edited book on The Paradox of Repression, co-edited with Lester R. Kurtz.

You can review cases of nonviolent campaigns that have involved repression against nonviolent activists that backfired against authorities in the Global Nonviolent Action Database, based at Swarthmore College.

Celebrating 100 years of the Fellowship of Reconciliation

FOR_tree

 

 

 

 

This year the Fellowship of Reconciliation is celebrating its 100th anniversary. The FOR is the largest, oldest interfaith peace organization in the United States, working for peace, justice and nonviolence since 1915.

The Swarthmore College Peace Collection is mounting an exhibit to honor this remarkable century of activism for peace, social justice, and international understanding.

The exhibit will open on July 29, 2015, and run through August 11, 2015.

Location:
McCabe Library, Swarthmore College, Swarthmore, PA 19081
Directions

Time:
8:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., Monday through Thursday, and 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Fridays.

Open to the public.

For further information contact Wendy Chmielewski at wchmiel1@swarthmore.edu.

Celebrating 75 years of the Center on Conscience and War

Center on Conscience and War 75th

Swarthmore College McCabe Library Exhibit celebrating 75 years of work in defense of conscience and objection to war from The Center on Conscience and War.

Open to the public
July 9-27, 2015

Reception and opening event for the exhibit:
July 16, 2015,
11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
McCabe Library, Lobby
Refreshments served

For 75 Years the Center on Conscience and War has been working to assist those whose conscience leads them to object to war, as conscientious objectors. Hear from past and current conscientious objectors, including:

  • Bill Galvin, CCW’s Counseling Coordinator and Vietnam-era CO
  • Bill Yolton, CCW’s former Director
  • former Senior Airman Jarrod Grammel, whose CO application was approved earlier this year

Learn about the current legal climate for rights of conscience in the U.S. from Peter Goldberger, a local lawyer, from Ardmore, PA, who has practiced CO law for some three decades.

Contact Wendy Chmielewski (wchmiel1@swarthmore.edu) for more information.

Congratulations to the class of 2015!

As we begin commencement celebrations, we want to extend our warmest congratulations to our graduating seniors and their family and friends!

  • Amanda Beebe
  • Brian Kaissi
  • Lauren Mirzakhalili
  • Osazenoriuwa Ebose
  • Averill Obee
  • Michael Herbert
  • Sarah Gonzales

It has been a pleasure to work with you, and we look forward to remaining in touch as you begin new chapters and new work!

We know that you go forward prepared to think about how to conduct conflict in constructive ways, how to advance justice, and how to cultivate more peaceful human relations.  Let’s support each other in our efforts, and we hope the Peace and Conflict Studies Program will remain a base for collaboration and mutual education.

Again, congratulations!!

Swarthmore Commencement

 

For Fall 2015! Research Seminar: Strategy and Nonviolent Struggle

PEAC 071B. Research Seminar: Strategy and Nonviolent Struggle (Cross-listed as POLS 081 / SOCI 071B) will be offered during the Spring Semester 2015.

Global Nonviolent Action Database banner

 

This one-credit research seminar involves working and updating the Global Nonviolent Action Database which can be accessed by activists and scholars worldwide at http://nvdatabase.swarthmore.edu. The database was built at Swarthmore College and includes cases of “people power” drawn from dozens of countries. The database contains crucial information on campaigns for human rights, democracy, environmental sustainability, economic justice, national/ethnic identity, and peace.

Students will be expected to research a series of cases and write them up in two ways: within a template of fields (the database proper) and also as a 2-3 page narrative that describes the unfolding struggle.  In addition to research/writing methods, students will also draw on theories in the field.  Strategic implications for today will be drawn from theory and from what the group learns from the documented cases of wins and losses experienced by people’s struggles.

This writing (W) course has a limited enrollment of 12 students.

You can learn more by visiting a collection of posts about the database in the Peace and Conflict Studies blog.

In this video, Professor Lakey introduced the launch of the database in 2011.

 

Fall 2015 Line-up of Peace & Conflict Studies Courses

In addition to all of the excellent courses offered across campus that may be counted toward a minor in Peace and Conflicts Studies, our own program curriculum is expanding next year!

PEAC 015. Introduction to Peace and Conflict Studies

In Introduction to Peace and Conflict Studies, we learn that peace and conflict are not mutually exclusive. To paraphrase Conrad Brunk, the goal of peace and conflict studies is to better understand conflict in order to find nonviolent ways of turning unjust relationships into more just ones. We examine both the prevalence of coercive and non-peaceful means of conducting conflict as well as the development of nonviolent alternatives, locally and globally, through institutions and at the grassroots. The latter include nonviolent collective action, mediation, peacekeeping, and conflict transformation work. Several theoretical and philosophical lenses will be used to explore cultural and psychological dispositions, conflict in human relations, and conceptualizations of peace. The course will take an interdisciplinary approach with significant contributions from the social sciences. U.S.-based social justice movements, such as the struggle for racial equality, and global movements, such as nonviolent activism in Israel/Palestine, and the struggle for climate justice around the world, will serve as case studies.

1 credit. Tues/Thurs. 1:15-2:30 pm

Instructor: Sa’ed Atshan

 PEAC 039. Social Entrepreneurship for Social Change (NEW COURSE!)

By integrating innovative approaches with revenue-generating practices, social entrepreneurs and their ventures open compelling and impactful avenues to social change. In this course, students will learn about the pioneering individuals and novel ways that social entrepreneurship responds to social needs that are not adequately served by the market or by the state through in-depth case analysis of social change work (locally, nationally, and globally).

1 credit. Mondays 1:15-4:00 pm

Instructor: Denise Crossan, Lang Professor for Social Change


 

 PEAC 053. Israeli-Palestinian Conflict  (NEW COURSE!)

This course will examine the historical underpinnings of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and how they have shaped the contemporary context in Israel/Palestine. We will approach this from a demography and population-studies framework in order to understand the trajectories and heterogeneity of Israeli and Palestinian societies and politics. For instance, how has the relationship between race and period of migration to Israel impacted Ashkenazi and Mizrahi Israeli sub-populations differently? What explains divergent voting patterns between Palestinian Christians and Muslims over time? How can we measure inequality between Israeli settlers and Palestinian natives in the West Bank in the present? The course will also synthesize competing theoretical paradigms that account for the enduring nature of this conflict. This includes—but is not limited to—the scholarly contributions of realist political scientists, US foreign policy experts, social movements theorists, security sector reformers, human rights advocates, international law experts, and negotiations and conflict resolution practitioners.

Eligible POLS and ISLM credit.

1 credit. Tues./Thurs. 2:40-3:55 pm

Instructor: Sa’ed Atshan


PEAC 071B. Research Seminar: Strategy and Nonviolent Struggle

(Cross-listed as POLS 081 and SOCI 071B)

This research seminar involves working with The Global Nonviolent Action Database built at Swarthmore College. This website is accessed by activists and scholars worldwide. The database contains crucial information on campaigns for human rights, democracy, environmental sustainability, economic justice, national/ethnic identity, and peace. Students will investigate a series of research cases and write them up in two ways: within a template of fields (the database proper) and also as a narrative describing the unfolding struggle. Strategic implications will be drawn from theory and from what the group is learning from the documented cases of wins and losses experienced by people’s struggles.

1 credit.  Mondays 1:15-4:00 pm

Instructor: Lee Smithey

Making Moral Arguments About Divestment

Making Moral Arguments About Divestment

Hans Oberdiek, Professor Emeritus
Krista Thomason, Assistant Professor
Department of Philosophy

Monday, April 6, 2015
4:30 p.m.
Science Center 199

In conversations about divestment, economic arguments often take center stage. What about the moral arguments? Is divesting the right thing to do? Could there be moral arguments against divestment? Moral philosophers have been making moral arguments since the earliest days of philosophy, so the tools and skills they use can be helpful in thinking about the moral issues surrounding divestment. Join us for a conversation about the moral arguments for and against divestment.

2014-09-22-climate_marchers_nyc

This event is presented by the Philosophy Department and the Peace & Conflict Studies Program

Strategic, Successful, and Spiritually Grounded Activism

Strategic, Successful, and Spiritually Grounded Activism
Speaker: Eileen Flanagan

Wednesday, April 1, 2015; 5:00 PM
Bond Hall at Swarthmore College (directions)
500 College Avenue, Swarthmore, PA

After five years of campaigning, Earth Quaker Action Team (EQAT) has pushed the seventh largest bank in the US into issuing a policy that effectively ends its investment in mountaintop removal coal mining. Eileen Flanagan will share her own story of feeling led to join EQAT’s campaign and what she is learning about nonviolent direct action.

Eileen Flanagan

Eileen Flanagan is the clerk of the board of Earth Quaker Action Team, a teacher in Pendle Hill’s new Answering the Call to Radical Faithfulness program, and a member of Chestnut Hill Friends Meeting. Her newest book, Renewable: One Woman’s Search for Simplicity, Faithfulness, and Hope , is about the spiritual crisis that led her to climate justice activism.

This event is open to the public.

Flanagan_RENEWABLE

 

Political Homophobia in Africa

“Political Homophobia in Africa”
A Talk by Professor Kim Yi Dionne
Thursday, March 26th, 7:30 PM
Kohlberg Hall 116
Swarthmore College (directions)

Sponsored by STAND, Forum for Free Speech, and the Political Science Department

The last few years have seen significant state-led homophobic actions in Nigeria, Zimbabwe, and a number of other African countries, with Uganda even introducing a bill that would make homosexuality punishable by death.

Kim Yi Dionne

STAND is bringing Smith College Professor of Government Kim Yi Dionne to discuss the recent homophobic trends in African politics. She will discuss its modern and colonial roots, the political benefits homophobia offers to governments, and the effects of state-sponsored homophobia on LGBT communities.

Kim Yi Dionne’s work focuses on politics, development, HIV/AIDS, and LGBT rights. She has written for Foreign Affairs and Foreign Policy, appeared on the BBC, and is a regular contributor to the Washington Post.

The event is sponsored by STAND, Forum for Free Speech, and the Political Science Department.